Rights and Responsibilities

Student Responsibilities

  • Complete and submit application materials to the appropriate agencies within required or recommended timeframes.
  • Read all materials sent to you from the Financial Aid Office and other agencies awarding you aid. Read, understand, and keep copies of all forms you sign.
  • Know and comply with the rules governing the aid you receive. These rules include but are not limited to:
    • You must not be in default on any prior educational loan
    • You must not owe a refund on a Federal Pell Grant or a Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant due to repayment
    • You must provide additional documentation, federal tax transcripts, federal tax returns, W-2s, verification documentation and any additional information if requested by the student financial aid office
    • You must comply with the provisions of any promissory note and all other agreements you sign, including repaying your student loans
    • You must complete the registration process each term by the end of the Add/Drop period to ensure availability of all student aid funds you have been awarded
    • You must use student financial aid proceeds solely for direct educational costs and related living expenses
    • You must maintain satisfactory academic progress
    • You must report private sources of student financial aid to the student financial aid office
    • You must report any changes in your marital, academic, enrollment, residential or name status
    • You must keep your local and permanent addresses current with the Hebrew College registrar

Student Rights

All records and data submitted with your application for financial aid will be treated as confidential information, as prescribed by the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). All students have the right to:

  • Have an explanation of the award process
  • Be notified of changes in your financial aid status and the reasons for those changes
  • Know the conditions of any loan you accept

Code of Conduct

The Office of Student Financial Aid has adopted the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators’ (NASFAA) Statement of Ethical Principles and Code of Conduct (pdf), which helps to guide financial aid professionals in ensuring transparency in the administration of student financial aid programs. In addition, the student financial aid office follows legislated requirements prohibiting a conflict of interest regarding the administration of Title IV student loans and the responsibilities of an agent of the college.

  1. Employees shall not solicit or accept any gift having a monetary value of more than a nominal amount from a lender, guarantor, or servicer. Certain items are not considered gifts, such as training materials, meals at training events, and philanthropic contributions not related to student loans. Employees may also be reimbursed for reasonable expenses incurred in serving on the advisory board, commission, or group.
  2. Employees shall not enter into any revenue-sharing arrangement with any lender where the lender provides or issues a Title IV loan to the student or student’s family in exchange for the school recommending the lender or the lender’s loan products in exchange for a fee or material benefit including profit or revenue sharing that benefits the school or a school’s employee or agent.
  3. Employees shall not accept from any lender or affiliate of any lender, any fee, payment, or other financial benefit (including the opportunity to purchase stock) as compensation for any type of consulting arrangement or other contract to provide services to a lender or on behalf of a lender relating to education loans.
  4. The college shall not request or accept funds from any lender for private education loans including funds for an opportunity pool loan to it students in exchange for the school providing promises of a specified loan number or volume or a preferred lender arrangement for educational loans.
  5. Employees shall not assign, through award packaging or other methods, a first-time borrower’s loan to a particular lender or refuse or delay processing of a loan based on the borrower’s selection of a lender or guarantor.
  6. Employees shall not accept or request any assistance with call center or financial aid office staffing from any lender except as allowed by law.

Satisfactory Academic Progress

Satisfactory academic progress is defined as the measure of progress toward the completion of a course of study according to the standards of Hebrew College and as required by federal regulations.

The standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) apply to all financial assistance programs including Federal Pell Grant, Federal Direct Loans and Grad PLUS Loans, as well as any assistance received from the state and from Hebrew College. SAP standards apply to all students: full-time, part-time, degree and certificate candidates, even if they are not receiving aid.

Undergraduate Students

The satisfactory academic progress of an undergraduate student will be reviewed based on the following standards:

Qualitative Standard

For qualitative purposes, satisfactory academic progress requires a cumulative Quality Point Average (QPA) of 2.7 (C+) or better by the end of two academic years. Students will be reviewed at least annually thereafter to evaluate eligibility for aid, and must maintain at least a 2.5 QPA (C) in order to continue to receive financial aid.

Quantitative Standard

Students must also meet two quantitative requirements to retain their eligibility for financial aid.

  1. Credit Completion Rate: We measure a student’s quantitative standards by reviewing completed credits as a percentage of attempted credits. Beginning with periods of enrollment after spring 2011, students must earn at least 67 percent of their cumulative attempted credits to maintain satisfactory academic progress. To calculate this number, all attempted hours will be totaled and multiplied by 0.67 to determine the number of credit hours a student must have earned in order to continue to receive financial aid. *See example below.
  2. Maximum Time Frame Standard: Students will not be eligible to receive financial aid they you have attempted more than 150 percent of the normal credits required for their degree or certificate program. For the majority of programs at Hebrew College, this means that students must complete their degree in a maximum of seven and a half years. Students that go beyond seven and a half years will not be eligible to receive financial aid.

Important Considerations

The following are considered when evaluating a student’s satisfactory academic progress:

  • Withdrawals (W), incompletes (I) and (PI), no grade (NG) and failures (F) are considered attempted but not earned hours.
  • Passing credits received for pass/fail courses are considered attempted and earned credits; failing grades in pass/fail courses are considered attempted but not earned.
  • Repeated courses are included in the calculation of both attempted and earned hours. A student is allowed to repeat a course only twice. No federal aid is allowed to be given for courses that are passed and then repeated only to get a better grade.
  • Transfer credits are included in the credit-completion rate and maximum time-frame calculations, but not the GPA.

Graduate Students

A graduate student’s satisfactory academic progress will be reviewed based on the following standards:

Qualitative Standard

For qualitative purposes, satisfactory academic progress requires a cumulative Quality Point Average of 3.0 or better. The qualitative standard will be reviewed annually. Students who fail to meet this standard will not be eligible for federal aid until the cumulative 3.0 QPA is achieved.

Quantitative Standards

Students must also meet two quantitative requirements to retain their eligibility for financial aid.

  1. Credit Completion Rate: The Financial Aid Office measures a student’s quantitative standards by reviewing completed credits as a percentage of attempted credits. Students must earn at least 50 percent of their cumulative attempted credits to maintain satisfactory academic progress. To calculate this number, all attempted hours will be totaled and multiplied by 0.50 to determine the number of credit hours a student must have earned in order to continue to receive financial aid. *See example below.
  2. Maximum Time Frame Standard: Students will not be eligible to receive financial aid once they have attempted more than 150 percent of the normal credits required for their degree or certificate program.

*Example: Andrew and Marie enroll in 16 credits per semester for the first year. At the end of the second semester, Andrew has earned a total of 20 credits and Marie has earned a total of 30 credits. To be making satisfactory progress, they must have earned 67 percent of the credits attempted by the end of each increment. By the end of the second semester, they must have earned 22 credits (67 percent x 32). Marie is meeting SAP, but because Andrew only earned 20 credits, he is not.

Important Considerations

The following are considered when evaluating a student’s satisfactory academic progress:

  • Withdrawals (W), incompletes (I) and (PI), no grade (NG) and failures (F) are considered attempted but not earned hours.
  • Passing credits received for pass/fail courses are considered attempted and earned credits; failing grades in pass/fail courses are considered attempted but not earned.
  • Repeated courses are included in the calculation of both attempted and earned hours. A student is allowed to repeat a course only twice. No federal aid is allowed to be given for courses that are passed and then repeated only to get a better grade.
  • Transfer credits are included in the credit-completion rate and maximum time-frame calculations, but not the GPA.

Appeals of Ineligibility Due to Nonsatisfactory Academic Progress

Students who appeal their ineligibility due to not making satisfactory academic progress have the right to have their situation reviewed by the Office of Financial Aid. Approval of a student’s financial aid appeal will be based on extenuating circumstances outside the normal school activities that have an impact on the student’s ability to achieve the minimum standards of satisfactory academic progress. Cases to consider may fall into the following categories:

  • Student becomes seriously ill. Spouse, child or other relative has medical emergency.
  • Student is severely injured. Spouse, child or other relative has medical emergency.
  • Student’s family member dies.

Other cases may be considered if they are determined to have caused physical or psychological stress on a student. Each situation is reviewed on a case-by-case basis. These requirements, stating time-frame and consequences, must be submitted in writing by the student and documented in their file. A student’s eligibility for all aid will be lost in the next semester if the student does not meet the requirements in the period stated.

Regaining Eligibility

Students may regain eligibility for aid during the academic year if they reach the minimum standards of satisfactory progress within the same period of enrollment. Students may continue to attend courses without the assistance of federal, state or institutional funding. In addition, students may be able to attend classes elsewhere in order to demonstrate eligibility for reconsideration of aid.

Students are determined to be eligible for funds based on the timing in which they reach the minimum standards. The U.S. Department of Education’s standards outline different eligibility criteria for students who meet satisfactory progress standards within the current period of enrollment versus those who regain eligibility in a later period. The financial aid office will award appropriate aid as specified by the U. S. Department of Education.