Fall 2014 Online Courses

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Cantorial
Education
Hebrew (online)
History
Rabbinics

CANTORIAL
         

COURSE TITLE

COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

How to Chant Torah
Syllabus 

CG CANTR 528

Schwartz

Online

3

In this online course, students learn the history and analysis of the punctuation system underlying the chanting of the Hebrew Bible. Through audio coaching, students learn a traditional Ashkenazic mode for the public cantillation of the Torah and correct contemporary pronunciation of biblical Hebrew. Prerequisite: facility with reading Hebrew. Cantorial students may audit only; will not count for graduate credit for master's students in the cantorial program.

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EDUCATION
         

COURSE TITLE

COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Models of Teaching
Syllabus

CG EDUC 601 W1

Rodenstein

Online

3

In this course, students will analyze a wide repertoire of teaching models in Jewish education, influenced by content, students and institutional contexts, which represent techniques, philosophical approaches and values of teachers. The course will examine rationales for choosing or adapting different models and students will practice alternative approaches. Features of lesson planning and how to structure lessons and courses for Jewish educational settings will also be considered. In addition, students will reflect on their own teaching experiences and collaboratively assess alternative ways to address the range of educational issues that they encounter.

Human Development and Learning
Syllabus 

CG EDUC 802

Price

Online

3

This course explores the relationship between human development and a lifelong trajectory of Jewish growth and learning. By exploring various developmental theories, including cognitive, psychosocial and moral development, students will gain a deeper understanding of the developmental needs of, challenges facing and opportunities for learners from early childhood through adulthood. Over the course of the semester, students will both analyze and design Jewish educational programs that address learners’ developmental needs. 

Families, School and Community
Syllabus
 

CG EDUC 503

Katzman

Online

3

This course will provide students with an understanding of the theories, best practices and skills of relationship-building among families, schools and communities, in both broad educational environments and in Jewish schooling, in particular. We will consider the impact that family, school and community partnerships have upon children’s’ education and development. Factors that impact these partnerships, such as cultural and religious values, societal forces, communication skills and differing expectations of parents and teachers will be explored. The course work will provide students with a theoretical basis on which they will develop a vision and plan for building partnerships among families, schools and community. 

Curriculum Design for Teaching God and Israel
Syllabus

CG EDUC 683 

Price

Online

3

The overarching enduring understanding for this course is that Jewish educational curricula, when intentionally and effectively designed, can serve as a guide to help students encounter and wrestle with complex ideas such as God and Israel. In order to uncover this enduring understanding, this course will explore both theoretical frameworks of curriculum development as well as pedagogic applications of how the subject matter of God and Israel can be taught in liberal Jewish settings. Throughout the course, students will work through the various stages necessary to construct a curriculum focused on questions related to either God or Israel and will end the semester with a finished product that can be implemented in a learning setting.   

Experiential Learning Online: The Jewish Court of All Time
Syllabus

CG EDUC 690

Skolnick Einhorn

Online

3

In this new course, students will explore the role of technology, online games and role play in experiential Jewish education. Interacting as mentors in the Jewish Court of All Time, a middle-school online history simulation in Jewish day schools, students will work to understand the online learning environment and philosophies for engaging students in "native" environments that potentially encourage deeper interactions and learning. At the same time, course readings, exercises and discussions will hone students’ ability to leverage online experiential learning toward specific learning outcomes, while managing potential distractions, glitches and non-participation by the learners. The course will have implication for both online and in-person learning environments, as well as for multiple educational settings.   

Case Studies in Special Education: Technology and Curriculum Accommodations
Syllabus 

CG EDUC 585 Margolis Online 3

This course will focus on key case studies that have impacted the delivery and definition of Special Education in this country and Jewish Special Education. Two main foci will be on cases surrounding assistive technology and curriculum accommodations. The goal of these focal points is for students to understand how Special Education is implemented in various Jewish settings (Day School, Religious Schools, experiential education settings, etc.). Current issues will also be addressed (e.g., services provided at religious institutions by state funded staff).

Case Studies in Jewish Special Education
Syllabus 

CG EDUC 585A Margolis

Online:
Sept. 8-Oct. 8

1

This one-credit course, the first five-week module of Case Studies in Special Education: Technology and Curriculum Accommodations (listed above), will focus on several introductory case studies that have impacted the delivery and definition of Special Education in this country and Jewish Special Education. This is an overview course which will give students the background information for understanding the evolution of special education service delivery in American Schools and in Jewish educational settings (schools, synagogues, camps). Students will also have the opportunity to research current case studies in their field of interest and/or geographical location (e.g., Special Education services in Israel).

Accomodations, Modifications and EdTech
Syllabus

CG EDUC 585B

Margolis Online: Oct. 8-Dec. 19 2

What would you do if Helen Keller, James “Radio” Kennedy and Albert Einstein were your students in a classroom of 25 students? How would you educate them? Prior to 1972 in Massachusetts (and 1975 nationwide in the USA), your answer would be, “I wouldn’t. They would not be in my class.” Since then, this is one of the questions educators face each year as they have students with all types of opportunities for growth. This course will prepare students to implement accommodations and modifications in curricula.  Technology will be studied as an arena to develop accommodations. By the end of the course, students will be able to answer, (1) How does the teacher develop curricular accommodations among students with and without special needs, and between students and teachers? (2)  What special education practices have been accepted as good universal teaching practices? (3) What roles can technology play in designing accommodations?

Philosophies of Education and Leadership in Jewish Thought and Practice

ED JLS 902 Shire

Online:
Sept. 8-Oct. 24

3

The work in this course is divided into two parts. In the first part, we will examine some important modern philosophers of Jewish education, in order to become familiar with some of the different approaches in this field and the purposes of Jewish education. In the second part, we will attempt to move from these more abstract levels of reflection to contemplate concrete areas and issues in contemporary Jewish education. This will give us a chance to explore how philosophical perspectives inform educational strategies and practices, whether explicitly or implicitly; it will also provide an opportunity for students to begin to spell out their own philosophical positions on real topics in day to day Jewish education, as they contemplate their educational  leadership in these areas and challenges. Enrollment is limited to students in the Jewish Educational Leadership Program, or by permission of instructor. 

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HEBREW (ONLINE)
         

All classes require purchase of a standard Hebrew-English dictionary. All online Hebrew classes use Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch) as textbook either Volume 1 or Volume 2. See individual course description.

All courses are offered September 8th through December 19, 2014

COURSE TITLE

COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Mekhina (Preparation) for Hebrew Language 

CU HEBRW 010

Levy

Online

0

This course is designed to serve as an introduction to Hebrew language study and to ensure that students with some prior Hebrew study experience begin Modern Hebrew I at comparable levels. The Mekhina introduces the Hebrew alphabet and vowels, as well as verbs and syntax sufficient for conducting simple daily conversation. Students work at their own pace, submitting oral and written homework, and taking online quizzes. Weekly real-time class discussions are conducted by the instructor with small groups of students at comparable levels. The Mekhina is based on the seven introductory units of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), the textbook used by Hebrew College’s campus-based and online Hebrew Language programs. Textbook: Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 1. Mekhina will cover the Introductory units of the textbook. Prerequisite: No prior knowledge of Hebrew is required.

Hebrew I 

CU HEBRW 110

Levy

Online

4 UG

This course enables students to recognize and use fundamental structures of Hebrew grammar and morphology, and to acquire the necessary vocabulary for basic conversation and reading of modern and classical texts. All language skills are mastered through elementary syntactic and grammatical structures. Students will learn the basic verbs in the different common active verb groups and their conjugation in the present and past tense. Students will read and listen to stories and dialogues, and participate in guided class discussions. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write their own dialogues and passages. All language skills are mastered through more advanced syntactic and grammatical structures. Textbook: Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 1. Hebrew I will cover Lessons 1–14 of the textbook. Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.

Hebrew IA

 CU HEBRW 111A

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the first half of Hebrew I, Lessons 1–7 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.
 

Hebrew IB 

 CU HEBRW 111B

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the second half of Hebrew I, Lessons 8–14 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.

Hebrew II 

 CU HEBRW 210

Levy

Online

4 UG

A continuation of Hebrew I Online, this course enables students to recognize and use additional structures of Hebrew grammar, morphology and vocabulary to read modern and classical texts, and to engage in conversation. Students will read and listen to stories and dialogues, and participate in guided class discussions. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write their own dialogues and passages. All language skills are mastered through more advanced syntactic and grammatical structures. Students will learn the past tense of verb groups introduced in Hebrew I. Textbook: Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 1. Hebrew II covers Lessons 15–28 in the textbook. Prerequisite: Hebrew 1 or placement test.

Hebrew IIA 

 CU HEBRW 211A

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the first half of Hebrew II, Lessons 15–21 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew 1 or placement test.

Hebrew IIB 

 CU HEBRW 211B

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the second half of Hebrew II, Lessons 22–28 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew 2A or placement test.

Hebrew III 

 CU HEBRW 310

Levy

Online

4 UG

Students will learn to recognize and use new and more complex structures of Hebrew grammar and morphology, such as combined sentences, and will acquire vocabulary for advanced reading of modern and classical texts, and for conversation. Lessons include readings of longer passages, dialogues and stories. Students will be given the opportunity to practice the new syntactic and grammatical structures. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write short expository passages and deepen their mastery of spoken Hebrew through participation in open conversation. Textbook: Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2. Hebrew III covers Lessons 1-8 in the textbook. Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or placement test.

Hebrew IIIA 

 CU HEBRW 311A

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the first half of Hebrew III, Lessons 1–4 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or placement test.

Hebrew IIIB 

 CU HEBRW 311B

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the second half of Hebrew III, Lessons 5–8 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 3A or placement test.

Hebrew IV 

 CU HEBRW 410

Levy

Online

4 UG

This course is designed for intermediate students who have successfully mastered Hebrew reading, writing and speaking skills. Students will practice writing directed and complex sentences, as well as free composition. In weekly oral assignments and class discussions, only Hebrew is spoken. Through extensive readings, students will expand their vocabulary and increase their familiarity with grammatical patterns. Students will learn the future tense of basic verbs in the strong verb groups, as well as frequently used weak verbs. Textbook: Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2. Hebrew III covers Lessons 9-16 in the textbook. Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 or placement test.

Hebrew IVA 

 CU HEBRW 411A

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the first half of Hebrew IV, Lessons 9–12 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 or placement test.

Hebrew IVA 

 CU HEBRW 411B

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the second half of Hebrew IV, Lessons 13–16 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 4A or placement test.

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HISTORY
         

COURSE TITLE

 COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Text and Context: Biblical and Rabbinical Periods
Syllabus 

CG HIST 541

Mesch

Online

3

In this course, we will encounter the Tanakh and Rabbinic literature and the cultures and civilizations in which they developed. We will read substantial portions of original texts (in translation) along with key secondary sources to provide students with a framework through which they can gain understanding of the key issues and concepts that underlie these texts and their history. We will also be attentive to the variety of ways that the Bible and Rabbinic literature are read and interpreted. There are no prerequisites for this class; it will be taught as an introductory course for graduate students and as an introduction to graduate work in Jewish Studies.

The Eastern European Era: New Approaches to Understanding the Development of Jewish Life in Europe
Syllabus 

CG HIST 533 Liekis Online 3

The study of Eastern European Jewry has benefited from renewed interest and new capabilities following the collapse of the Soviet Union and the re-emergence of the independent states of East-Central Europe. Conditions of censorship and restricted access have given way to new scholarly initiatives and renewed support. This course will focus on the following themes: a) the specific character of the Jewry of East-Central Europe including religious, cultural, intellectual, political and economic history; b) relations between Jews and non-Jews from the later 18th century under a variety of ruling empires up to recent developments of independence and the revival of Jewish life; c) contemporary attempts to engage the Jewish past by both Jews and non-Jews and attempts to come to terms with the difficult legacy of the Holocaust. The course will also explore the nature of the archival resources now available for genealogical research in the context of gaining a deeper understanding of the social and personal history of the Jewish community.

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RABBINICS
         

COURSE NAME

COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Readings in Masechet Berakhot: Striving for Community and Kavod in Ancient Judaism
Syllabus 

CG RAB 552 Spitzer Online 4

The Rabbis describe the period before the destruction of the Second Temple in Jerusalem as a time of “causeless hatred” between different sects of the Jewish people. We will explore how Rabbinic Judaism after the destruction tried to establish a community committed to Kavod as a primary value while at the same time balancing the values of dignity and community against other Jewish values. We will explore a variety of rabbinic texts, primarily from the first three chapters of tractate Berakhot in the Mishnah and the Babylonian Talmud with parallels from the Tosefta and the Talmud of the Land of Israel. Throughout, we will focus on the various ways the Rabbis use narratives alongside legal texts in order to create a complex conversation with the reader. Texts will be studied in Hebrew and in English. This course will also have a one hour hevruta session each week where students will be paired off for real-time study of texts related to the course. The instructor will be available during parts of these sessions for guidance and instruction. Students may use this course to fulfill their Hebrew language text requirement.

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