me'ah instructor at whiteboard

Me'ah Faculty

The high caliber of instruction — equivalent to a university-level course — makes Me'ah the most unique Jewish adult-learning program in the country. Instructors are accomplished scholars with advanced degrees. They are skilled educators of adults, able to employ their strengths and adapt their approaches both to the Me'ah curriculum and to a range of learning styles.

rachel adelman

Rachel Adelman, Ph.D.

Rachel Adelman provides a dynamic, open approach to text study, drawing on a wide range of sources, from Tanakh and classical midrash to modern Israeli poetry. She holds a Master of Arts in Jewish Studies from Matan/Baltimore Hebrew University and a Ph.D in Hebrew literature, with a specialty in midrash, from The Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Adelman's first book "The Return of the Repressed: Pirqe de-Rabbi Eliezer and the Pseudepigrapha" (Brill, 2009) is based on her dissertation work. Her second book, "The Female Ruse: Women’s Deception and Divine Sanction in the Hebrew Bible," is forthcoming with Sheffield Press. She also teaches Hebrew Bible at Hebrew College.

rabbi sharon cohen anisfeld

Rabbi Sharon Cohen Anisfeld

Sharon Cohen Anisfeld has been dean of the Rabbinical School since 2006. Prior to assuming this position, she served as an adjunct faculty member and then dean of students at the school. After graduating from the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College in 1990, Cohen subsequently spent 15 years working in pluralistic settings as a Hillel rabbi at Tufts, Yale and Harvard universities. She has been a summer faculty member for the Bronfman Youth Fellowships in Israel since 1993 and is co-editor of two volumes of women's writings on Passover, "The Women's Seder Sourcebook: Rituals and Readings for Use at the Passover Seder" (Jewish Lights Publishing, 2002) and "The Women's Passover Companion: Women's Reflections on the Festival of Freedom" (Jewish Lights Publishing, 2002).

david ariel

David Ariel, Ph.D.

David Ariel is an adult Jewish educator in the Boston area. Previously, he served as president of the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. He also served as president of Siegal College of Judaic Studies in Cleveland. Ariel is a graduate of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and received a master's and Ph.D. from Brandeis University. He is the author of four books, including "Kabbalah: The Mystic Quest in Judaism" (Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, 2005) and "What Do Jews Believe? The Spiritual Foundations of Judaism" (Shocken, 1996).

Jay Berkowitz


Rabbi Jay R. Berkovitz, Ph.D.

Jay Berkovitz is professor and chair of the Department of Judaic and Near Eastern Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He earned his Ph.D. degree at Brandeis University and rabbinic ordination from Rabbi Dan Chanan in Jerusalem. Berkovitz's research and teaching focus on the early modern history of the Jews, with special emphasis on Jewish law, family, ritual and communal governance. He is the author of "Protocols of Justice: The Pinkas of the Rabbinic Court of Metz, 1771-1789" (Brill, 2014). Berkovitz has held visiting appointments at Bar Ilan University, University of Connecticut at Storrs, Yeshiva University and Hebrew University. In 2011-12, he was the Inaugural National Endowment for the Humanities Senior Scholar at the Center for Jewish History in New York. He currently serves as joint editor-in-chief of the journal Jewish History.

david bernat

David Bernat, Ph.D.

David Bernat is executive director of Synagogue Council of Massachusetts and a lecturer in Judaic Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He holds a bachelor’s degree from the Jewish Theological Seminary and a Ph.D. in biblical Interpretation from Brandeis University. Bernat is the author of “Sign of the Covenant: Circumcision in the Priestly Traditions,” and co-editor of “Religion and Violence: The Biblical Heritage.” He has been with the Me’ah program  since 1997, and planned and led Me'ah's summer Israel Study tour.

Marc Brettler

Marc Brettler, Ph.D., H'15

Marc Brettler is the Bernice and Morton Lerner Chair of Religious Studies at Duke University. He was formerly the Dora Golding Professor of Bible in the Department of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies at Brandeis University, where he was awarded the Michael L. Walzer Teaching Prize. He is the author of many articles on literary and historical aspects of biblical texts, including being co-editor of "The Jewish Study Bible" (Oxford University Press; 2004), winner of a National Jewish Book Award in 2004. Brettler has been a Me'ah instructor since the program's inception.

shaye j.d. cohen

Rabbi Shaye J.D. Cohen, Ph.D.

Shaye J. D. Cohen is an ordained rabbi and the Littauer Professor of Hebrew Literature and Philosophy in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at Harvard University. Before arriving at Harvard in 2001, he was for 10 years the Samuel Ungerleider Professor of Judaic Studies and professor of Religious Studies at Brown University. The focus of Cohen's research is the boundary between Jews and gentiles and between Judaism and its surrounding culture. He is also a published authority on Jewish reactions to Hellenism and to Christianity.

Reuven Cohn

Rabbi Reuven Cohn, J.D.

Reuven Cohn is an adult Jewish educator and an attorney. He is a veteran teacher in the Me'ah program and also teaches at Hebrew College and Maimonides School. He holds rabbinic ordination from Yeshiva University and a law degree from Yale, and has done advanced graduate work in Jewish studies at Harvard University. Among his areas of interest are Jewish interpretations of the Bible, the literary development of the Mishnah and Talmud, and history of the prayer book.

leonard gordon

Rabbi Leonard Gordon

Leonard Gordon is senior rabbi at Congregation Mishkan Tefila in Chestnut Hill, Mass., and rabbi emeritus at the Germantown Jewish Centre in Philadelphia. He has taught literature and history of rabbinic Judaism at Hebrew College, the Jewish Theological Seminary, the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College, Ohio State University and Kenyon College, where he directed the Integrated Program in Humane Studies. Gordon was ordained at the Jewish Theological Seminary and has a master's in religious studies from Brown University and a Master of Philosophy in Religion from Columbia University.

Lynne Heller

Lynne Heller, Ph.D.

Lynne Heller combines a passion for the biblical text and wide-ranging knowledge of it with her academic background in comparative literature and Jewish studies. Deeply committed to teaching adults, she has taught in Hebrew College’s Kol Isha, as well as the Ma’ayan, CJP Genesis and Parenting Through a Jewish Lens programs. She has also taught Bible in the Rabbinical School. Heller holds a Ph.D in English and comparative literature from New York University and is a graduate of the MIDRASA, Hebrew Teachers College, established by the Yeshivah of Flatbush in New York City. Her essay, “Teaching to the Head and the Heart: The Power of Weeping,” was recently published in "Keeping Faith in Rabbis: A Community Conversation on Rabbinical Education" (Avenida Books, 2014).

Dan Judson

Rabbi Dan Judson

Dan Judson is the director of professional development and placement at the Rabbinical School of Hebrew College. Before that, he served for 10 years as the spiritual leader of Temple Beth David of the South Shore in Canton, Mass. In 2003, he was the Daniel Jeremy Silver Fellow at Harvard University. Judson has co-authored a number of books on Jewish rituals. His articles on American Jewish history have appeared in various journals. Judson is a doctoral candidate in Jewish history at Brandeis University, where his research focuses on the history of synagogues and money.

Deeana Copeland Klepper

Deeana Copeland Klepper, Ph.D. 

Deeana Copeland Klepper is associate professor of religion and history at Boston University, where she teaches classes on Christianity, Judaism and Islam, especially in medieval context. Her research focuses on Christian and Jewish approaches to biblical interpretation and medieval Christian-Jewish encounter more generally. She is the author of “The Insight of Unbelievers: Nicholas of Lyra and Christian Reading of Jewish Texts in the Later Middle Ages” and a range of articles and essays. Keeper is currently working on a project that examines the intersections between Christian theological approaches to Jews and Judaism and the practical engagement between Christians and Jews in medieval European society. She holds a PhD in medieval European history from Northwestern University.

lori lefkovitz

Lori Hope Lefkovitz, Ph.D.

Lori Hope Lefkovitz holds the Ruderman Chair in Jewish Studies at Northeastern University, where she is professor of English and director of both the Jewish studies program and the Humanities Center. Lefkovitz is a scholar of narrative and narrative theory and has published widely on the Hebrew Bible. She has taught at Kenyon College, the Reconstructionist Rabbincal College, Northeastern University and as scholar-in-residence throughout the Jewish community for several decades. She has published four books, the most recent of which, "In Scripture: The First Stories of Jewish Sexual Identities," was a finalist for the 2010 National Jewish Book Award in the category of women’s studies. Lefkovitz holds a Ph.D. from Brown University.

Shari Lowin

Shari Lowin, Ph.D.

Shari Lowin is associate professor of religious studies at Stonehill College. She previously taught at the University of Chicago, Yeshiva University, Brooklyn College and in Ma'ayan. Lowin is fluent in Arabic and has researched and published on a number of topics comparing Judaism and Islam. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.

Maud Mandel

Maud Mandel, Ph.D.

Maud Mandel is associate professor of Judaic studies and history at Brown University. She holds a bachelor's degree from Oberlin College and master's and doctoral degrees from the University of Michigan. She teaches courses on many aspects of modern Jewish history, including history of the Holocaust, Zionism and the birth of the state of Israel, and history of American Jews.

Natan Margalit

Rabbi Natan Margalit, Ph.D.

Natan Margalit  is spiritual leader of The Greater Washington Coalition for Jewish Life, in western Connecticut, and visiting rabbi at Congregation Adas Yoshuron, in Rockville, Maine. After graduating from Reed College with a degree in anthropology, he went on to receive rabbinic ordination at The Jerusalem Seminary and earn a Ph.D. in Talmud from the University of California, Berkeley.

Jacob Meskin

Jacob Meskin, Ph.D.

Jacob Meskin both teaches in and trains faculty for Hebrew College's Jewish adult-learning program, Me'ah, and is one of the co-authors of the curriculum for Parenting Through A Jewish Lens, in which he also teaches. In addition, he works as a consultant on adult Jewish education and teacher training in the Boston area. Prior to joining Hebrew College, Meskin was the inaugural holder of the Ruderman Chair in Jewish Studies at Northeastern University and taught at Princeton University, Rutgers University, the Bernard Revel Graduate School of Yeshiva University, Williams College and Lehigh University. His articles have appeared in Modern Judaism, The Journal of Religion, Soundings, Levinas Studies, Judaism, Cross Currents and in several edited volumes.

rabbi jeremy morrison

Rabbi Jeremy S. Morrison

Jeremy S. Morrison has served since 2001 as rabbi at Temple Israel of Boston. In addition to his pulpit responsibilities, he currently directs Temple Israel’s education programs. Morrison is the founder of the Riverway Project, a nationally recognized synagogue-based outreach and engagement initiative for adults in their 20s and 30s. He was ordained from the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in New York and is currently a doctoral student at Brandeis University.

paul nahm

Paul E. Nahme, Ph.D.

Paul Nahme is the Dorot Assistant Professor of Judaic Studies and assistant professor of religious studies at Brown University. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Toronto and has studied rabbinic literature and Jewish law at Yeshivat Chovevei Torah. Nahme's research interests focus on modern Jewish philosophy and rabbinic thought, intellectual history, ethics, hermeneutics and the philosophy of law. His current book project examines the philosophy of Hermann Cohen in the context of late-19th-century Wilhelmine Germany and interrogates Cohen’s response to the philosophical problem of secularity for German-Jews living in a Protestant state.

simon rabinovitch

Simon Rabinovitch, Ph.D.

Simon Rabinovitch teaches modern Jewish, European and Russian history at Boston University, and has served since 2010 as an associate at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard University. He is a graduate of McGill University and holds master's and doctoral degrees in comparative history from Brandeis University. Rabinovitch’s published work has examined different aspects of Jewish intellectual history, Jewish politics in revolutionary Russia and the history of folklore and ethnography. He is also an occasional contributor to Haaretz (English) and an editor at The Marginalia Review of Books.

rabbi micha'el rosenberg 

Rabbi Micha'el Rosenberg, Ph.D.

Micha'el Rosenberg joined the Hebrew College faculty in August 2012. He formerly served as rabbi of the Fort Tryon Jewish Center and an adjunct professor of Talmud and codes at the Jewish Theological Seminary, both in New York City. He has taught Bible, Talmud and halakhah in a variety of settings, including the Drisha Institute for Jewish Education, the National Havurah Institute and the Northwoods Kollel and Beit Midrash of Ramah Wisconsin, and has a particular interest in the intersection of Jewish studies and legal theory. An alumnus of the Wexner Graduate Fellowship program and Harvard College, Rosenberg holds a doctorate in Talmud and rabbinic literature.

rabbi benjamin samuels

Rabbi Benjamin Samuels, Ph.D.

Benjamin J. Samuels, a veteran Me'ah instructor, has been rabbi of Congregation Sha'arei Tefillah in Newton, Mass., since 1995. He holds a bachelor's degree in English literature and a master's degree in Bible and medieval Jewish history from Yeshiva University. Samuels is a Genesis Scholar at CJP and teaches broadly in the Greater Boston Jewish community. He is currently completing a Ph.D. in religion and science at Boston University.

Michael Satlow

Michael Satlow, Ph.D. 

Michael Satlow is professor of Judaic studies and religious studies at Brown University. He is the author of "Creating Judaism: History, Tradition, Practice" (Columbia University Press, 2006) and "How the Bible Became Holy" (Yale University Press, 2015). Satlow holds a Ph.D. in ancient Judaism from the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, and has taught in the Me'ah program for the last decade. He has held fellowships from the John S. Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, Fulbright Scholar Program and the American Council of Learned Societies, among others.

Meir Sendor

Rabbi Meir Sendor, Ph.D.

Rabbi Meir Sendor has served for more than 20 years as spiritual leader of Young Israel of Sharon. He holds rabbinic ordination from Yeshiva University and a doctorate in medieval Jewish history from Harvard University. Sendor lectures widely on Jewish history, philosophy, law and mysticism.

Jeffrey Shoulson

Jeffrey Shoulson, Ph.D.

Jeffrey Shoulson is the Konover Chair in Judaic Studies, director of the Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life, and professor of literatures, cultures and languages at the University of Connecticut. He holds a bachelor's degree from Princeton University, Master of Philosophy from the University of Cambridge and PhD from Yale University. His scholarship focuses on Jewish-Christian relations in the medieval and early-modern periods, especially the ways in which Jews and Judaism are represented within Christian writings and Christianity influences or is thematized in Jewish writings.

adam teller

Adam Teller, Ph.D.

Adam Teller is associate professor of history and Judaic studies at Brown University, where he teaches history of the Jews in Eastern Europe, the history of Jewish family, the development of modern Jewish mysticism and Hasidism, and Jewish popular culture. Prior to joining Brown in 2010, he was on the faculty of the University of Haifa. Teller is a graduate of Oxford University and holds a Ph.D. in modern Jewish history from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.