Spring 2013 Courses

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discipline:


Bible
Cantorial
Education
Hebrew (online)
Hebrew (on campus)
History
Interdisciplinary
Jewish Thought
Literature
Music
Rabbinics
Rabbinical School Courses - only available to rabbinical students

See daily schedule





BIBLE
         

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

Genres and Themes of Biblical Literature II

Adelman

M,W 11:15-1:15

3

BIBLE 502B

Focusing on biblical poetry, this course will introduce students to modes of poetic analysis and embedded narrative poetry. The course will cover Psalms, Shirat Devorah and Shirat Hayam. The prophetic cycle will be covered by topic, including Oracles Against the Nations, Tochechah, the book of Eichah (Lamentations), and Nechemta. Individual sessions will cover Job, Proverbs and Kohelet, Song of Songs. A synthetic session on Messianism and Eschatology will conclude the semester. Particular attention is paid to understanding of the Hebrew text, and to the linguistic and literary characteristics of the different genres. Second part of a two-semester sequence. Prerequisite: Hebrew IV.

Studies in the Book of Exodus (Syllabus)

Frankel

Online

4

BIBLE 521

Covers the major narrative sections of the book of Exodus, including the plague narrative and the crossing of the Sea,-the-Sinai theophany,-the golden calf incident and the renewal of the covenant. The major sections will be studied in-depth from a critical perspective.-Particular emphasis will be placed on the theological underpinnings of the-texts. Emphasis will also be placed upon the literary growth and evolution-of the texts within their ancient historical contexts. Finally, attention will-be given to the manner in which the texts were interpreted in classical Jewish exegesis. This will form the basis for-an evaluation of the similarities and-differences between the critical-historical and traditional-approaches to the biblical text and how they might interact and augment-one another.

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CANTORIAL
         

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

How to Lead Shabbat Services (Syllabus)

Schwartz

Online

3

CANTR 514

Provides students with both theoretical background and basic skills necessary to lead Sabbath services. Students will analyze the musical modes of "nusah haTefillah," master the significant musical motifs needed for leading traditional services in the Ashkenazic tradition and learn principles for choosing appropriate congregational melodies to be used during Shabbat services, based on the analysis of the musical modes assigned to the various liturgical units. Does not count for graduate credit for students in the cantorial program.

Cantillation 1 (Syllabus)

Jacobson

Tu, 11:15 am-1:15 pm

3

CANTR 529

Students analyze the punctuation system underlying the chanting of the Hebrew Bible. Students are instructed in the syntactic parsing and correct contemporary pronunciation of biblical Hebrew and learn a traditional Ashkenazic mode for the public cantillation of the Pentateuch. Prerequisites: Hebrew 6, an adequate sense of musical pitch and the ability to read and translate biblical Hebrew.

Rosh Hashanah Nusach (Syllabus)

Mayer

M,W, 11:15 am-1:15 pm

4

CANTR 553

Focuses on the modes and motifs of Rosh Hashanah. Participants will learn how to lead services using motivic improvisation within the established framework of Ashkenazic tradition. Appropriate congregational melodies will also be covered; students will be introduced to selected cantorial recitatives, and coached on their authentic rendering. Prerequisite: CANTR 550.

Cantorial Coaching

Staff

TBA

1

CANTR 579

Provides coaching by a practicing cantor, who will guide students according to their individual needs. Goals of coaching are to increase facility with prayer-leading and to improve vocal and musical interpretations of selected repertoire as pertains to the Jewish lifecycle. Students will be evaluated on the benchmark requirements by the third year of residency to ascertain proficiency. May be repeated for credit. Enrollment is limited to students who have successfully auditioned into one of the School of Jewish Music programs or by permission of SJM faculty.

Accompanied Repertoire for Shabbat (Syllabus)

Treitman, Klepper

Th, 11:15-1:15

3

CANTR 595

Learn musical modes for Ashkenazic prayer chant and analyze their structural elements as well as specific motivic content for leading festival services within the Ashkenazic tradition. In practicum sessions, emphasis is on modal and motivic improvisation within the established framework of Nusach Ashkenaz. Congregational melodies for festival services will also be covered. Prerequisite: Daily Nusach.

Cantorial Internship II

Treitman

TBA

1

CANTR 922

Students spend a semester on location in a synagogue, observing a practicing cantor. The on-site cantor meets with and coaches student in the practical application of skills learned in the classroom.

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EDUCATION
         

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

Seminar in Educational Leadership and Supervision (Syllabus)

Regosin

Online

3

EDUC 710

Explores the process of educational supervision, instructional leadership and organizational leadership in Jewish education. Students will consider and practice varied models of supervision and staff development and examine issues of change in Jewish education. In addition, students will practice Jewish educational leadership skills, including public speaking, homiletics and educational planning and problem solving. For advanced students and supervisors.

Graduate Research Seminar in Jewish Education: Final Project

Einhorn, Shire

W, 6-7:30 pm (meets monthly)

1

EDUC 707

Continuation of yearlong course, required for all candidates for the MJEd degree.

Theory and Practice of 21st Century Jewish Education (Syllabus)

Price

Online

3

EDUC 834

Explores the theories of 21st century Jewish education and ways that these theories inform practice. We will examine different tools for learning and teaching across educational venues. The course will explore how different applications support current theories in Jewish education and will also identify the pedagogic implications for integration of technology and ideas of 21st century education into learning experiences for Jewish education.

Spiritual Development for Jewish Education (Syllabus)

Shire

Th, 11:15 am-1:15 pm; also offered online

3

EDUC 626

Seeks to explore the spiritual life of the child by drawing upon the latest research and our own experience, offering a Jewish lens with which to view this spirituality from our traditional sources. We will seek to develop new practices for Jewish education in classrooms, camps, synagogues and community centers that nurture the Jewish spiritual life of our children. The course will offer an educational focus for spiritual development, including the spirit of the child, sacred teaching, spiritual learning and transforming Jewish education.

Seminar in Experiential Jewish Education (Syllabus)

Levy

Online

3

EDUC 825

In this course, students will consider the models of Jewish education characterized as “informal.” Among the most vital educational experiences are those which place a high value on social interaction, varieties of learning settings, life experiences, community building, free play, multisensory engagement, incidental learning, outdoor education, youth work, leadership and group travel. Informal education has been a central dimension of Jewish education for nearly a century. While exploring the history of Jewish informal education, students will consider the range of skills and educational opportunities presented by informal contexts such as camps, youth movements, Israel programs, social-action projects, extracurricular learning and varieties of social networks within schools and beyond formal schooling.

Special Education and Technology (Syllabus)

Shay-Davidson, Bar Or

Online: Jan. 28-March 1

1

EDUC 579

Students will explore the many ways in which technology can be integrated into their teaching to support students with special learning needs. While technology can help all students, for those with special needs it can help students with organizational and learning issues and aid in communication with parents. Using Web 2.0 tools, applications and interactive white boards (or adapting it for those without them), participants will learn ways to integrate technology into their curriculum, including teaching Hebrew.

Assessments for Hebrew-English Language Environments (Syllabus)

Sokol

Online: April 8-May 10

1

EDUC 580

Focuses on understanding the results of assessments done through public schools or independent evaluations in order to teach Hebrew and Judaic content to students with special needs. Students will learn how to conduct authentic assessments for students with special needs in these areas so they can assess progress and share information with parents, regardless of which textbooks or curriculum are used.

Bible and Israel for Early Childhood Education (Syllabus)

Rodenstein

Online

3

EDUC 504

This course will explore theory and practice for curricula focusing on Bible and Israel for the early childhood classroom. The course will focus on age-appropriate methods to introduce these ideas to young children. Bible topics will include selection of choice narratives with an array of supporting activities and resources, practice of adult text study coupled with child-friendly rewrites of selected verses, and creation of Torah-based curricula. Israel topics will focus on the “Israel Connection” — its philosophical base and resources for programmatic application, including our own “Images of Israel,” experiential learning and the empowerment of parents in the “Virtual Israel Trip,” and teaching Israel through children’s literature, highlighting the life of children in Israel and the centrality of Jerusalem.

Supervised Field Experience I

Schultz

N/A

1

EDUC 915

Full academic year-long supervised experience in a Jewish setting, i.e., school, agency or synagogue. A minimum of six to 10 hours per week is required. Experiences will be tailored to meet the professional goals and objectives of the individual student. If appropriate, a current paid position may be incorporated into the experience. Focus on execution of emerging skills, observation and basic knowledge. All experiences must be approved by the director of field experiences. Prerequisite: Models of Teaching in Jewish Education (EDUC 601); may be taken concurrently.

Supervised Field Experience II

Schultz

N/A

1

EDUC 916

Full academic year-long supervised experience in a Jewish setting, i.e., school, agency or synagogue, that is different from the one experienced in EDUC 915. A minimum of six to 10 hours per week is required. Experiences will be designed to meet the professional needs of students at a more advanced level. Focus on application and integration of expanded knowledge. If appropriate, a current paid position may be incorporated into the experience. All experiences must be approved by the director of field experiences. Prerequisite: Supervised Field Experience I (EDUC 915).

Supervised Field Experience in Early-Childhood Education II

Schultz

N/A

1

EDUC 927

Full academic year-long supervised field experience in an early-childhood Jewish setting. A minimum of six to 10 hours per Eweek is required. Experiences will be designed to meet the professional needs of students. Focus on application and integration of expanded knowledge. If appropriate, a current paid position may be incorporated into the experience. All experiences must be approved by the director of field experiences. Prerequisite: Supervised Field Experience in Early Childhood I (EDUC 926).

Behavior Management in the Inclusive Classroom 

Miller-Jacobs

Online

3

EDUC 555

Students will learn to carry out a variety of behavior-change strategies within educational settings. Emphasis will be placed on the development of supportive classroom structures that lead to positive interactions among students with and without special needs, and between students and teachers. Students will also consider the Jewish dimension of behavioral management, specifically how values such as "derech eretz" can be reflected in general learning experiences. Offered to students at Pardes Institute of Jewish Studies via distance learning.

Technology and Jewish Education in Day Schools

Nagler

Online

3

EDUC 832

Explores the use of technology in the day-school setting as both a tool for learning and instruction. The course will look at some of the hardware options to integrate into classroom teaching in the Jewish studies content area of day schools. The course will also explore different software applications and their pedagogic implications for integration into learning experiences for Jewish content areas in day-school classes. Offered to students at Pardes Institute of Jewish Studies via distance learning.

Seminar in Jewish Day School Education

D. Lehmann

March 2013

3

EDUC 826

Students will study the unique learning contexts of Jewish day schools and the particular challenges and opportunities they present to teachers. Students will consider selected problems in teaching a curriculum that includes Jewish and general studies; integration of multiple disciplines; and intentions to foster Judaic, Hebraic and English literacy at high levels of understanding. This course is for student teachers in Jewish day schools as well as classroom teachers who are at the early stages of their careers in Jewish day-school training. Offered on campus to students enrolled in the Pardes Educators Program.

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HEBREW (ONLINE)
         

All classes require purchase of a standard Hebrew-English dictionary. 

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

Mekhina (Preparation) for Hebrew Language

Levy

Online

0

HEBRW 010

Designed to serve as an introduction to Hebrew language study and to ensure that students with some prior Hebrew study experience begin Modern Hebrew I at comparable levels. The Mekhina introduces the Hebrew alphabet and vowels, as well as verbs and syntax sufficient for conducting simple daily conversation. Students progress at their own pace, submit oral and written homework, and take online quizzes. Weekly real-time class discussions are conducted by the instructor with small groups of students at comparable levels. The Mekhina is based on the seven introductory units of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala" ("Hebrew From Scratch"), the textbook used by Hebrew College's campus-based and online Hebrew language programs. No prior knowledge of Hebrew is required.

Hebrew 1

Levy

Online

4 UG

HEBRW 110

Enables students to recognize and use fundamental structures of Hebrew grammar and morphology and acquire the necessary vocabulary for basic conversation and reading of modern and classical texts. All language skills are mastered through elementary syntactic and grammatical structures. Students will learn the basic verbs in the different common active verb groups and their conjugation in the present and past tense. Students will read and listen to stories and dialogues and participate in guided class discussions. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write their own dialogues and passages. All language skills are mastered through more advanced syntactic and grammatical structures. Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.

Hebrew 1A

Levy

Online

2 UG

HEBRW 111A

Covers first half of Hebrew I, Lessons 1-7, of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.

Hebrew 1B

Levy

Online

2 UG

HEBRW 111B

Covers second half of Hebrew I, Lessons 8-14, of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.

Hebrew 2

Levy

Online

4 UG

HEBRW 210

A continuation of Hebrew I Online, this course enables students to recognize and use additional structures of Hebrew grammar, morphology and vocabulary to read modern and classical texts and to engage in conversation. Students will read and listen to stories and dialogues and participate in guided class discussions. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write their own dialogues and passages. All language skills are mastered through more advanced syntactic and grammatical structures. Students will learn the past tense of verb groups introduced in Hebrew I. Prerequisite: Hebrew I or placement test.

Hebrew 2A

Levy

Online

2 UG

HEBRW 211A

Covers the first half of Hebrew II, Lessons 15-21, of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew I or placement test.

Hebrew 2B

Levy

Online

2 UG

HEBRW 211B

Covers the second half of Hebrew II, Lessons 22-28, of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew 2A or placement test.

Hebrew 3

Levy

Online

4 UG

HEBRW 310

Students will learn to recognize and use new and more complex structures of Hebrew grammar and morphology, such as combined sentences, and will acquire vocabulary for advanced reading of modern and classical texts and for conversation. Lessons include readings of longer passages, dialogues and stories. Students will be given the opportunity to practice the new syntactic and grammatical structures. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write short expository passages and deepen their mastery of spoken Hebrew through participation in open conversation. Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or placement test.

Hebrew 3A

Levy

Online

2 UG

HEBRW 311A

Covers the first half of Hebrew III, Lessons 1-4, of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or placement test.

Hebrew 3B

Levy

Online

2 UG

HEBRW 311B

Covers the second half of Hebrew III, Lessons 5-8, of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 3A or placement test.

Hebrew 4

Levy

Online

4 UG

HEBRW 410

Designed for intermediate students who have successfully mastered Hebrew reading, writing and speaking skills. Students will practice writing directed and complex sentences, as well as free composition. In weekly oral assignments and class discussions, only Hebrew is spoken. Through extensive readings, students will expand their vocabulary and increase their familiarity with grammatical patterns. Students will learn the future tense of basic verbs in the strong verb groups, as well as frequently used weak verbs. Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 or placement test.

Hebrew 4A

Levy

Online

2 UG

HEBRW 411A

Covers the first half of Hebrew IV, Lessons 9-12, of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 or placement test.

Hebrew 4B

Levy

Online

2 UG

HEBRW 411B

Covers the second half of Hebrew IV, Lessons 13-16, of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 4A or placement test.

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HEBREW (ON CAMPUS)
         

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

Understanding Hebrew Texts: Fundamentals for Beginners 2 (Syllabus)

Davis

W, 6:30-9:15 pm

4 UG

HEBRW 220

Will enable students to acquire additional vocabulary and expand their knowledge of Hebrew grammar, with readings of increasing complexity. Selections from classical texts will also be introduced to familiarize students with both the shared and distinctive features of Hebrew in its different periods. The pace of the course will be brisk and a significant investment of time in home study will be expected. Second course of the Understanding Hebrew Texts sequence.

Understanding Hebrew Texts: Fundamentals for Beginners 4 (Syllabus)

Davis

Th, 9:30 am-12:15 pm

4 UG

HEBRW 420

Students will continue to apply and extend their knowledge of Hebrew grammar to texts and build their vocabulary, with the goals of enhancing their ability to independently read and understand Jewish texts in Hebrew. Wherever possible, connections will be made to familiar Hebrew passages from other contexts. The pace of the course will be brisk, and a significant investment of time outside the classroom will be expected.

Sources: Reading in Hebrew

Davis

Th, 6:30-9:15 pm

3

HEBRW 520

this course has been canceledOffers a unique experience of learning Hebrew throughout its history,via diverse genres of literature. The course draws on a variety of Hebrew texts from a selection of sources including the Bible, mishnah, midrash, medieval texts, Hassidic tales, haskala-era Hebrew literature and modern Hebrew short stories. The anthology of readings will be drawn from the Book of Exodus, "Ethics of Our Fathers," as well as works of Maimonides, Ramban, Yehuda HaLevi, Martin Buber, Shai Agnon, Hayim Nachman Bialik, Meir Shalev, Amos Oz and Etgar Keret. Grammatical concepts will be fully integrated into this literature-oriented course. Second part of a two-semester sequence.

Hebrew 6 (Syllabus)

Davis

M, T, 2:30-4:30 pm; F, 9-11 am

4

HEBRW 206

Building on Hebrew 3 and 4, the two-semester sequence of Hebrew 5 and 6 focuses on more advanced modern-Hebrew language structures and prose writings. Students will deepen their understanding of the Hebrew language, with emphasis on skill acquisition and development through the extensive use of classical and modern texts. This course gives a systematic presentation of grammatical and syntactic principles of biblical and rabbinic Hebrew (including vocabulary). Texts of different styles, such as narrative, poetry, prophecy and wisdom literature, are examined with an emphasis on literary analysis.

Hebrew 8 (Syllabus)

Bock

T, 2:30-4:30 pm

3

HEBRW 208

A continuation of Hebrew language skills, building upon Hebrew 7.

 
ULPAN
 
Click here for list of Ulpan courses
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HISTORY
         

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

Second Temple and Early Rabbinic Judaism (Syllabus)

Klawans

M, 2:30-4:30 pm

3

HIST 151

this course is closedA survey of the diversity and development of Judaism in the ancient world, covering some of the events and phenomena that shaped ancient Judaism: the impact of Hellenism, the Maccabean revolt and the Roman conquest. Some course time is devoted to the first century of the Common Era — the important period that saw both the birth of Christianity and the destruction of the ancient Jewish state, which in turn gave way to the beginnings of rabbinic civilization.

History and Memory: Medeival and Modern Periods (Syllabus)

Fuchs

Online

3

HIST 534

this course is closed

Working within a chronological framework, this course will trace the creative transformation of Judaism in the medieval period and the profound challenges posed by modernity. Students will have the opportunity to critically engage with primary sources. Major events and personalities of these two historical periods will be considered.

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INTERDISCIPLINARY
         

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

Jewish Life and Practice 2

Berman

F, 11:15 am-1:15 pm

3

INTD 016

Students will be introduced to the patterns and essential terminology of the cycle of Jewish religious life and other basic Jewish practices.

Holocaust and Jewish Life: Jewish Identity and Its Transformations Since 1945

Mesch

Th, 11:15 am-1:15 pm

3

INTD 540

In the years following the end of World War II, Jews have struggled to face the enormity of the Holocaust. This struggle has had a deep and lasting impact on Jewish identity throughout this period, both in Israel and in the Diaspora. It took a while for the Holocaust to emerge as a central feature of Jewish consciousness after 1945. But once it did, it had a profound effect on Jewish identity. Has that effect diminished? What are some of the ways that Jewish identity has shifted, and what role does the Holocaust play in Jewish identity today? This course will examine some of the themes and questions that beset the Jewish community and allow participants to reflect on how these themes have been transformed in the 21st-century. We will utilize literature, theology, sociology, film, psychology, memoirs, etc. as we embark on this journey of discovery.

Lifecycle Officiating (Syllabus)

Sokol

Tu, 9-11 am

3

INTD 580

Students will be trained to officiate at a variety of Jewish lifecycle events, including weddings, funerals, unveilings and baby-namings. Traditional as well as contemporary rituals will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on both musical and textual aspects of these ceremonies. Prerequisite: Hebrew fluency and the ability to read music, or permission of the instructor.

Graduate Research Seminar

Mesch

W, 2:30-4:30 pm

2

INTD 601

Students will complete work on their master's papers and discuss research methods and approaches to the field. At the end of the course, students will present the results of their research to the Hebrew College community in a public forum. Required of all MAJS and MJLS students, this course is normally taken during the spring semester, prior to graduation.

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JEWISH THOUGHT
         

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

Searching for God and Self: Spirituality and Tradition in the Jewish Philosophy of Rabbi Joseph Soloveitchik (Syllabus)

 

Meskin

W, 7-9 pm

3

JTHT 547

canceledPerhaps alone among modern Jewish thinkers, R. Joseph Soloveitchik produced a philosophy of authentic selfhood deeply rooted in Jewish tradition. He drew on a dazzling array of sources, including contemporary physics, "halakhic" codes, kabbalistic literature, modern mathematics, secular poetry, 19th and 20th century philosophy, and above all the Talmudic tradition of which he was a recognized master. Taking advantage of the recent burgeoning of translations and secondary works devoted to Soloveitchik, this course will offer a user-friendly overview of Soloveitchik's life and work, with a focus on the following goals: clarifying Soloveitchik's overall philosophical position and his debt to other thinkers;-n++explaining his use of Talmudic and other traditional materials; exploring his relationship to modernity and modern values; and analyzing the details of his spiritual and psychological vision of selfhood.

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LITERATURE
         

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

Franz Kafka (Syllabus)

 

Gillman

Online

4

LITER 558

Studies the writing of Franz Kafka (1883-1924), the best-known German prose writer of the 20th century, in English translation. Structured according to broad topics that mark the contours of Kafka's body of writing: the individual within the family; the individual within society, functioning in the domains of work, the academy and the legal system; the quest for metaphysical certainty; and the crisis of Jewish identity in the modern world. Since Kafka's oeuvre is compact, we will be able to read a large part of it: the three novels, most important short stories, aphorisms, diaries, the letter to his father and his lecture on Yiddish. A series of expository and creative-writing assignments will provide further practice in interpreting and writing about literature.

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MUSIC
         

COURSE NAME

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

Voice Lessons

Staff

Private lessons

1

MUSIC 200

Emphasis is on understanding the working of the vocal mechanism, maximizing the potential of the individual singer, learning to be an effective vocal teacher and preparing the student to be an inspiring performer. Students will be taught how to use correct technique while singing a variety of different styles of music. Students will be required to participate in a studio recital once each semester and to memorize the music that is being performed. To adjudicate progress, students will be required to sing in Vocal Boards, performing a liturgical selection either from memory or from the Hebrew text, and a secular piece from memory from repertoire to be approved in advance. May be repeated for credit.

Musicanship Skills 2

Sokol

Tu, Th, 8-9 am

3

MUSIC 302

Continuing on the skills learned in Musicianship Skills I, this course prepares students to sing at sight an intermediate vocal line; to sing all intervals; to recognize aurally all intervals, triads, scales and modes; to locate and play any pitch or triad on a keyboard; and to analyze the harmonies and phrase structure of intermediate compositions. Students are introduced to modes, extended chords and chord inversions. Prerequisite: MUSIC 301.

Kol Arev: Workshop 

Leiberman

M, 4:30-6:30 pm

1

MUSIC 305

For students who have successfully auditioned for and who will serve during the academic year as members of Kol Arev, the Hebrew College choir.

Choir

Lieberman


1

MUSIC 546

Students sing or serve as conducting interns in a choir specializing in Jewish repertoire. Participation must be approved in advance with the choir coordinator. May be repeated for credit. Pre- and co-requisites: Fundamentals of Musicianship 2 or equivalent.

Senior Recital

Staff

Private lessons

1

MUSIC 905

Private lessons in singing with emphasis on preparing the student for the senior recital. This course is taken instead of voice lessons during final two semesters before graduation. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: MUSIC 200.

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RABBINICS
         

COURSE NAME

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

LEVEL

COURSE NO.

Introduction to Talmud (Syllabus)

Rhodes

Tu, 11:15 am-1:15 pm; Th, 2:30-4:30 pm

Mekorot

RAB 520

Learn the skills of analyzing a variety of Talmudic texts, "aggadic" and "halakhic." Learn basic Talmudic terminology, including a glossary of Hebrew and Aramaic terms and concepts, and how to use dictionaries, concordances and other reference tools to decipher and understand a Talmudic "sugya." This course also includes selections from the commentaries of Rashi and the Tosaphot, with an examination of their interpretive concerns and methods. Students will be required to record selections from texts in order to improve skills in reading rabbinic Hebrew.

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RABBINICAL SCHOOL COURSES



View courses by
discipline:

Bible
Education
Hebrew
History
Interdisciplinary
Jewish Thought
Practical Rabbinics
Rabbinics

       
BIBLE
         

COURSE NAME

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

YEAR

COURSE NO.

Genres and Themes of Biblical Literature 2 (Syllabus)

Adelman

M, W, 11:15 am-1:15 pm

Mekorot

BIBLE 502B

Focusing on biblical poetry, this course will introduce students to modes of poetic analysis and embedded narrative poetry. The course will cover Psalms, Shirat Devorah and Shirat Hayam. The prophetic cycle will be covered by topic, including Oracles Against the Nations, Tochechah, the book of Eichah (Lamentations), and Nechemta. Individual sessions will cover Job, Proverbs and Kohelet, Song of Songs. A synthetic session on Messianism and Eschatology will conclude the semester. Particular attention is paid to understanding of the Hebrew text, and to the linguistic and literary characteristics of the different genres. Second part of a two-semester sequence. Prerequisite: Hebrew IV.

Torah Core 1: Bereshit (Syllabus)

Adelman

Tu, 11:15 am-1:15 pm; Th, 2:30-4:30 pm

1

BIBLE 101

Continuation from fall semester.

Torah Core 2: Shemot (Syllabus)

Polen

M, 2:30-4:30 pm; F, 9-11 am

2

BIBLE 201

Continuation from fall semester.

Torah Core 3: Vayikra (Syllabus)

Polen

M, 9-11 am

3, 4

BIBLE 301

A close study of the book of Leviticus, including discussion of the themes of priesthood, ritual purity and holiness in biblical, rabbinic and later perspective. Students will study selected passages from Midrash halakhah, showing the relationship between biblical/priestly and rabbinic law.

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EDUCATION
         

COURSE NAME

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

YEAR

COURSE NO.

Rabbi as Educator (Syllabus)

Kaunfer

Tu, 11:15 am-1:15 pm

2

EDUC 921

Learn about approaches to adult education in the synagogue and community contexts. It includes training in supervision of religious education in the small congregational context.

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HEBREW
         

COURSE NAME

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

YEAR

COURSE NO.

Hebrew 6 (Syllabus)

Davis

M,Tu, 2:30-4:30 pm; F, 9-11 am

Mekorot

HEBRW 206

Building on Hebrew 3 and 4, the two-semester sequence of Hebrew 5 and 6 focuses on more advanced modern-Hebrew language structures and prose writings. Students will deepen their understanding of the Hebrew language, with emphasis on skill acquisition and development through the extensive use of classical and modern texts. This course gives a systematic presentation of grammatical and syntactic principles of biblical and rabbinic Hebrew (including vocabulary). Texts of different styles, such as narrative, poetry, prophecy and wisdom literature, are examined with an emphasis on literary analysis.

Hebrew 8 (Syllabus)

Bock

Tu, 2:30-4:30 pm

1

HEBRW 207

A continuation of Hebrew language skills, building upon Hebrew 7.

Aramaic (Syllabus)

Bock

F, 9-11 am

1

HEBRW 211

Explore the basic features of Aramaic language.

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HISTORY
         

COURSE NAME

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

YEAR

COURSE NO.

Second Temple and Early Rabbinic Judaism (Syllabus)

Klawans

M, 2:30-4:30 pm

1

HIST 151

this course is closed

A survey of the diversity and development of Judaism in the ancient world, covering some of the events and phenomena that shaped ancient Judaism: the impact of Hellenism, the Maccabean revolt and the Roman conquest. Some course time is devoted to the first century of the Common Era — the important period that saw both the birth of Christianity and the destruction of the ancient Jewish state, which in turn gave way to the beginnings of rabbinic civilization.

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INTERDISCIPLINARY

 





COURSE NAME

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

YEAR

COURSE NO.

Bet Midrash

Staff

Varies by class

Mekorot

RB-INTD 051

Bet Midrash

Staff

Varies by class

1

RB-INTD 101

Bet Midrash

Staff

Varies by class

2

RB-INTD 201

Bet Midrash

Staff

Varies by class

3

RB-INTD 301

Bet Midrash

Staff

Varies by class

4

RB-INTD 401

Bet Midrash

Staff

Varies by class

5

RB-INTD 501

Regular Bet Midrash participation is a required part of the Rabbinical School program. Complementing formal classroom study, students will be paired in "hevrutot" for intensive study of Jewish texts. This takes place during daily Bet Midrash hours within a supervised study-hall setting, where tutors are available to help students work with the original sources and to discuss ideas and issues that emerge from the text study.

Tefillah Groups

Staff

Th, 9-11 am

All

INTD 150

Required of all rabbinical students; optional for cantorial-ordination students.

Jewish Life and Practice 2

Berman

F, 11:15 am-1:15 pm

Mekorot

INTD 016

Students will be introduced to the patterns and essential terminology of the cycle of Jewish religious life and other basic Jewish practices.

Capstone Seminar, Jewish Studies

Kanarek

W, 3:30-5:30 pm

5

INTD 900

Continuation of fall semester; required of all graduating rabbinical students receiving the MAJS degree.

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JEWISH THOUGHT        

 





COURSE NAME

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

YEAR

COURSE NO.

Classical Jewish Thought (Syllabus)

Green

M, 11:15 am- 1:15 pm

2

JTHT 318

Explores the concept of Torah in classical rabbinic thought from the time of the Mishnah through the Babylonian Talmud. Primary texts enable us to discern ways in which the early Sages balanced belief in revelation with awareness of their own creativity, and allow us to consider the intellectual and spiritual challenges and innovations that ensued. Readings in the academic study of rabbinics help us to frame and appreciate our own conversation amid critical insights that have informed Jewish thought in our own time.

Contemporary Jewish Thought in Historical Context (Syllabus)

Rose, Judson

W, 11:15 am-1:15 pm

5

JTHT 518

Explores the vast changes wrought in Jewish life by modernization and secularization in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Responses to modernity by the leading Jewish thinkers of the era, including Martin Buber, Franz Rosenzweig, J.B. Soloveitchik, Mordecai Kaplan and Abraham Joshua Heschel will be examined.

Modern Jewish Thought in Historical Context (Syllabus)

D. Lehmann

Th, 2:30-4:30 pm

3, 4

JTHT 538

Explores the writings of several major Jewish thinkers living in the modern era. The course will focus on the various ways these thinkers — from Spinoza to Heschel — understand the dynamic relationship between inherited tradition and contemporary life situations.

Advanced Readings in Zohar (Syllabus)

Green

Tu, 11:15 am-1:15 pm

5

JTHT 609

An advanced course in the readings of Zohar.

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PRACTICAL RABBINICS        

 





COURSE NAME

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

YEAR

COURSE NO.

Pastoral Counseling

Judson, Brill-Austern

F, 9 am-noon (meets at ANTS)

4

PRAC 310

this course is closedProvides an overview of pastoral counseling, focusing on the counseling relationships that rabbis and other members of the clergy encounter. Students will gain an understanding of counseling, family systems, transference, self-care and other topics relevant to the role of rabbi as counselor. The course will also have an interfaith component and will be co-taught by Hebrew College and Andover Newton Theological School faculty. Enrollment is limited for this course; students must obtain written permission from their adviser to register. No noncredit registration permitted.

Internship

Judson

TBA

4

PRAC 351

Students will be matched with a community synagogue rabbi. Over the course of the year, students will shadow their mentors for a prescribed list of life-cycle events and synagogue activities.

Leadership Seminar

Shevitz

Th, 2:30-4:30 pm (10 sessions)

5

PRAC 510

Provides training to serve in leadership roles in Jewish religious and institutional settings. Course will cover how to be a leader who carries forth a vision and yet allows others to grow and participate in aspects of Jewish leadership, and how to work with institutions, including synagogues, to foster growth and creative change.

Leadership and Management for Rabbis and Rabbinical Students

Elkin

M, 4:30-6:30 pm

All

PRAC 511

A continuation of the course from fall semester.

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RABBINICS        

 





COURSE NAME

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

YEAR

COURSE NO.

Introduction to Talmud (Syllabus)

Rhodes

Tu, 11:15 am-1:15 pm; Th, 2:30-4:30 pm

Mekorot

RAB 520

Learn the skills of analyzing a variety of Talmudic texts, "aggadic" and "halakhic." Learn basic Talmudic terminology, including a glossary of Hebrew and Aramaic terms and concepts, and how to use dictionaries, concordances and other reference tools to decipher and understand a Talmudic "sugya." This course also includes selections from the commentaries of Rashi and the Tosaphot, with an examination of their interpretive concerns and methods. Students will be required to record selections from texts in order to improve skills in reading rabbinic Hebrew.

Jewish Living Core 1: Berakhot

Rosenberg

M,W, 11:15 am-1:15 pm

1

RAB 101

This semester concentrates on the traditional laws of Berakhot, beginning with classical sources that furnish basic categories and concepts. Then, guided by Rabbi Jacob ben Asher's influential Arbaah Turim and Rabbi Joseph Caro's Bet Yosef, the course explores the structure of the daily liturgy, with special attention to the ways in which rabbinic authorities in successive posttalmudic generations dealt with apparent anomalies and varying liturgical traditions. Important figures and texts in the history of the development of rabbinic law are introduced.

Jewish Living Core 3: Nashim U'Gvarim, Section A 

Kanarek

Tu & W, 9-11 am; Th, 11:15 am-1:15 pm

2, 3, 4

RAB 301

Jewish Living Core 3: Nashim U'Gvarim, Section B and C  Rosenberg Tu, 9-11 am (section C); Th, 11:15 am-1:15 pm (section B) 2, 3, 4 RAB 301

A textually based exploration of gender and sexuality as constructed in biblbical, classical rabbinic, "halakhic," mystical, folk and contemporary Jewish sources. The course will be grounded in the study of Talmudic and midrashic texts, the sources they draw upon and the Jewish traditions that they influence, with a view to present-day concerns. Contemporary scholarship and Jewish thought will also be discussed.

Hilchot Kiddushin V'Gitten, Section A 

Rhodes

Tu & W, 9-11 am

2, 3, 4

RAB 316

Hilchot Kiddushin V'Gitten, Section B 

Kanarek

W, 11:15 am- 1:15 pm

2, 3, 4

RAB 316

With a view to practical rabbinic applications, this course will survey the essential rules and regulations that traditionally govern marriage ceremonies and divorces. In addition to laying the groundwork of classical concepts and practices, the course will also consider present-day innovations, the challenges they pose and the opportunities that they provide.

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