Fall 2013 Online Courses





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BibleEducationHebrewHistoryInterdisciplinaryMusicUlpan

BIBLE
         

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

Selected Readings in Rashi on the Torah
Syllabus


Frankel

Online

4

CG BIBLE 565

This course introduces the student to the classical commentary of Rashi on the Torah. Central and typical sections of the commentary will be read and analyzed. Rashi's unique approach to biblical exegesis will be studied both in light of the historical context in which it was written and against the background of the rabbinic biblical exegesis expressed in the Talmud and Midrashim. Among the topics to be studied are: the conflict between Peshat and Derash; anti-Christian polemics; Rashi: textual exegete or religious moralist?; and central theological themes in Rashi's worldview. A major component of the course will focus on the development of the reading skills necessary for understanding Rashi's through. Chavruta study will play a vital role in achieving the goals of this course. Prerequisite: Hebrew IV

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EDUCATION
         

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

Models of Teaching in Jewish Education
Syllabus

Rodenstein

Online

3

CG EDUC 601 W1

In this course, students will analyze a wide repertoire of teaching models in Jewish education, influenced by content, students and institutional contexts, which represent techniques, philosophical approaches and values of teachers. The course will examine rationales for choosing or adapting different models and students will practice alternative approaches. Features of lesson planning and how to structure lessons and courses for Jewish educational settings will also be considered. In addition, students will reflect on their own teaching experiences and collaboratively assess alternative ways to address the range of educational issues that they encounter.

Jewish Life and Values 

Kaunfer

Online

3

CG EDUC 591

The purpose of this course is to engage educators with major concepts and values of Jewish life. The course will have a dual focus: content knowledge and pedagogic application. In studying each topic, students will be asked to consider both the concepts and sources of the topic, and how the topic can be taught and experienced by students in various educational settings. Students will study each area using classic texts along with modern commentaries. Topics will include the Jewish life cycle (birth, bar/bat mitzvah, marriage, divorce, adoption, death); values such as tzedakah, relationship between parents and children, Talmud Torah, k'vod haberiyot, bikur cholim, views of God; and Jewish practice (kashrut, tallit and tefillin).

Teaching and Learning Jewish History 

Einhorn

Online

3

CG EDUC 591

This course interweaves pedagogy and content in an integrated approach to teaching about American Jewish history and life. Through primary and secondary sources, students will explore the evolution of American Jewish organizations as well as their contemporary work, constituents and challenges. At the same time, the faculty will introduce pedagogical theory to help students consider how to utilize this content in formal and experiential learning environments. Students will thus gain a graduate level understanding of the communities in which they work, the skills to critically analyze historical and contemporary institutional texts, and a chance to explore application to practice in a variety of educational settings. Assignments and dialogue among students will help to formulate individualized strategies for teaching this at appropriate age levels and in varied environments.

Human Development and Learning 

Price

Online

3

CG EDUC 802

This course has two primary though somewhat separable goals: to introduce education students to models of human development, and to use this knowledge to analyze and create effective teaching paradigms for Jewish learners across the lifespan. Students will work on both goals simultaneously through a combination of didactic and experiential learning that focuses on a variety of Jewish educational settings.

Differentiated Instruction: Jewish Holidays and History 

Miller-Jacobs

Online: Sept. 30-Nov. 1

1

CG EDUC 569 W1

This course examines differentiated instruction, a way of thinking about teaching and learning that helps teachers manage an inclusive classroom in Jewish schools. Students will learn a variety of strategies for the Judaic curriculum that addresses the needs of all students, especially those with special needs. Students will create a differentiated unit to be used in their school as a model for creating additional units over time.

Jewish Views on Disabilities
Syllabus

Rothkopf

Online: Nov. 11- Dec. 13

1

CG EDUC 573

Jewish tradition has a great deal to say about disability. This module will trace the development of Jewish perspectives on disability from the bible through rabbinic sources and more contemporary understandings. We will consider issues pertaining to causation as well as Jewish responses to individuals with disability. This course is appropriate for education students as well as others interested in exploring the topic. 

Jewish Education in the 21st Century 

TBA

Online

3

ED JLS 6260

Explores specific challenges that face leaders of Jewish educational institutions and how successful leaders confront them. Examines utilization of technology, creativity, integrated and differentiated approaches to education as a myriad of tools for exploring the next best practices for educational ventures in the 21st century. Offered to students enrolled in the Jewish Education Leadership Program only.

Jewish Education in the 21st Century

TBA

Online

3

CG EDUC 931

Explores specific challenges that face leaders of Jewish educational institutions and how successful leaders confront them. Examines utilization of technology, creativity, integrated and differentiated approaches to education as a myriad of tools for exploring the next best practices for educational ventures in the 21st century. Students must have approval of the Dean to enroll.

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HEBREW 
         

All classes require purchase of a standard Hebrew-English dictionary.

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

Mekhina (Preparation) for Hebrew Language 

Levy

Online

Non-credit only

CU HEBRW 010

This course is designed to serve as an introduction to Hebrew language study and to ensure that students with some prior Hebrew study experience begin Modern Hebrew I at comparable levels. The Mekhina introduces the Hebrew alphabet and vowels, as well as verbs and syntax sufficient for conducting simple daily conversation. Students progress at their own pace, submit oral and written homework, and take online quizzes. Weekly real-time class discussions are conducted by the instructor with small groups of students at comparable levels. The Mekhina is based on the seven introductory units of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew From Scratch), the textbook used by Hebrew College's campus-based and online Hebrew Language programs. Textbook: Mekhina, Introductory units of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: No prior knowledge of Hebrew is required 

Hebrew I 

Levy

Online

4 UG

CU HEBRW 110

This course enables students to recognize and use fundamental structures of Hebrew grammar and morphology, and to acquire the necessary vocabulary for basic conversation and reading of modern and classical texts. All language skills are mastered through elementary syntactic and grammatical structures. Students will learn the basic verbs in the different common active verb groups and their conjugation in the present and past tense. Students will read and listen to stories and dialogues, and participate in guided class discussions. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write their own dialogues and passages. All language skills are mastered through more advanced syntactic and grammatical structures. Textbook: Hebrew I, Lessons 1–14 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.

Hebrew IA

Levy

Online

2 UG

CU HEBRW 111A

This course covers the first half of Hebrew I, Lessons 1–7 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.
 

Hebrew IB 

Levy

Online

2 UG

CU HEBRW 111B

This course covers the second half of Hebrew I, Lessons 8–14 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.

Hebrew II 

Levy

Online

4 UG

CU HEBRW 210

A continuation of Hebrew I Online, this course enables students to recognize and use additional structures of Hebrew grammar, morphology and vocabulary to read modern and classical texts, and to engage in conversation. Students will read and listen to stories and dialogues, and participate in guided class discussions. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write their own dialogues and passages. All language skills are mastered through more advanced syntactic and grammatical structures. Students will learn the past tense of verb groups introduced in Hebrew I. Textbook: Hebrew II, Lessons 15–28 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew 1 or placement test.

Hebrew IIA 

Levy

Online

2 UG

CU HEBRW 211A

This course covers the first half of Hebrew II, Lessons 15–21 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew 1 or placement test.

Hebrew IIB 

Levy

Online

2 UG

CU HEBRW 211B

This course covers the second half of Hebrew II, Lessons 22–28 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew 2A or placement test.

Hebrew III 

Levy

Online

4 UG

CU HEBRW 310

Students will learn to recognize and use new and more complex structures of Hebrew grammar and morphology, such as combined sentences, and will acquire vocabulary for advanced reading of modern and classical texts, and for conversation. Lessons include readings of longer passages, dialogues and stories. Students will be given the opportunity to practice the new syntactic and grammatical structures. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write short expository passages and deepen their mastery of spoken Hebrew through participation in open conversation. Textbook: Hebrew III, Lessons 1-8 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or placement test.

Hebrew IIIA 

Levy

Online

2 UG

CU HEBRW 311A

This course covers the first half of Hebrew III, Lessons 1–4 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or placement test.

Hebrew IIIB 

Levy

Online

2 UG

CU HEBRW 311B

This course covers the second half of Hebrew III, Lessons 5–8 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 3A or placement test.

Hebrew IV 

Levy

Online

4 UG

CU HEBRW 410

This course is designed for intermediate students who have successfully mastered Hebrew reading, writing and speaking skills. Students will practice writing directed and complex sentences, as well as free composition. In weekly oral assignments and class discussions, only Hebrew is spoken. Through extensive readings, students will expand their vocabulary and increase their familiarity with grammatical patterns. Students will learn the future tense of basic verbs in the strong verb groups, as well as frequently used weak verbs. Textbook: Hebrew III, Lessons 9-16 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 or placement test.

Hebrew IVA 

Levy

Online

2 UG

CU HEBRW 411A

This course covers the first half of Hebrew IV, Lessons 9–12 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 or placement test.

Hebrew IVA 

Levy

Online

2 UG

CU HEBRW 411B

This course covers the second half of Hebrew IV, Lessons 13–16 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 4A or placement test.

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ULPAN
 

The Ulpan fall semester will run from Sept. 23 to Dec. 20. Click here for list of Ulpan courses

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HISTORY
         

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

Text and Context: Biblical and Rabbinical Periods
Syllabus 

Mesch

Online

3

CG HIST 541

In this course, we will encounter the Tanakh and rabbinic literature and the cultures and civilizations in which they developed. We will read substantial portions of original texts (in translation) along with key secondary sources to provide students with a framework through which they can gain understanding of the key issues and concepts that underlie these texts and their history. We will also be attentive to the variety of ways that the Bible and rabbinic literature are read and interpreted. There are no prerequisites for this class; it will be taught as an introductory course for graduate students and as an introduction to graduate work in Jewish Studies.

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INTERDISCIPLINARY
         

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

Spirituality & Social Justice: Martin Luther King Jr. and Abraham Joshua Heschel
Syllabus 

Rose

Online

3

CG INTD 560

In this semester-length course, the lives and writings of two of the most celebrated religious figures in twentieth-century American culture—Martin Luther King Jr. and Abraham Joshua Heschel—are critically examined, exploring areas of commonality and difference. How did these men read the sacred texts of their traditions? Who were their teachers and spiritual guides? How did they enter public life? What was their understanding of the relationship between religion and American democracy? How did they view the inter-religious dimensions of their work? In addition to our studies of the biographies and writings of these two men, we will also spend significant time exploring the social and political contexts in they which they met and worked together. This will include a sustained exploration of the movement for African American civil rights and various forms of Jewish engagement with this issue.

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MUSIC
         

COURSE NAME

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

Music of the Jewish People
Syllabus 
Pinnolis Online 3

CG MUSIC 501

This online course investigates the role that music has played in Jewish life from ancient to modern times. Topics include music in the time of the Bible, rabbinic attitudes toward music, music and mysticism, the development of the modes for prayer and scriptural cantillation, church and synagogue music are compared, music of the holidays and the life cycle, folk and popular music in the Diaspora, the development of art music in the modern era and music in modern Israel. Prior knowledge of music is not required. Cannot count for graduate credit for the students in the Cantorial Ordination programs.

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