Fall 2013 Courses





View courses by discipline:

Bible
Cantorial

Education

Hebrew (on campus)

Hebrew (online)

History

Interdisciplinary

Jewish Thought

Liturgy

Music

Pardes

Rabbinics

Ulpan

See the daily schedule

BIBLE
         

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

Genres and Themes of Biblical Literature I
Syllabus 

Adelman

M, 11:30 am-1 pm

2

CG BIBLE 502A

This course will focus on Biblical narrative and legal discourse. The course will cover the arc of biblical history and historiography, examining prose selections from the Torah, as well as the historical books: Joshua, Judges, Samuel I and II, and Kings I and II. Several sessions will also focus on legal, prescriptive and proscriptive material, including ritual and civil law. Particular attention is paid to understanding of the Hebrew text, and to the linguistic and literary characteristics of the different genres. First part of a two-semester sequence. Prerequisite: Hebrew IV 

Selected Readings in Rashi on the Torah
Syllabus

Frankel

Online

4

CG BIBLE 565

This course introduces the student to the classical commentary of Rashi on the Torah. Central and typical sections of the commentary will be read and analyzed. Rashi's unique approach to biblical exegesis will be studied both in light of the historical context in which it was written and against the background of the rabbinic biblical exegesis expressed in the Talmud and Midrashim. Among the topics to be studied are: the conflict between Peshat and Derash; anti-Christian polemics; Rashi: textual exegete or religious moralist?; and central theological themes in Rashi's worldview. A major component of the course will focus on the development of the reading skills necessary for understanding Rashi's through. Chavruta study will play a vital role in achieving the goals of this course. Prerequisite: Hebrew IV

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CANTORIAL
         

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

Basic Nusach 

Torgove

F, 9-11:15 am

3

CG CANTR 517

(Due to the High Holy Days, the first class meets on Tuesday, Sept. 24)

This class is an introduction to the modes and motifs for synagogue prayer during weekday and Sabbath worship. Emphasis will be on basic proficiency in traditional prayer leading, rudimentary musical skills and an introduction to the liturgical structure of weekday and Shabbat services. Cannot count for graduate credit for students in Cantorial Ordination programs.
 

Cantillation II
Syllabus


Jacobson

Tu, 11:15 am-1:15 pm

3

CG CANTR 530

A continuation of Cantillation I, students are taught a common Ashkenazi tradition for the chanting of the book of Lamentations (Eicha), the haftarot and the scroll of Esther. Students prepare significant portions of text to be chanted and are critiqued by the instructor and their fellow students. Emphasis is on the three functions of the Masoretic cantillation signs: syllabic stress, syntactic structure and melodic organization. Prerequisite: Cantillation I 

Fundamentals of Ashkenazi Nusach
Syllabus

Mayer

F 9 am-1:15 pm

4

CANTR 550

(Due to the High Holidays, the first class meets on Tuesday, Sept. 24)

This course, which provides students with the skills necessary to lead daily services, serves as the foundation for the entire sequence of nusach for cantorial students. In the first part of the term students learn musical modes for Ashkenazic prayer chant and analyze their structural elements. Students then learn the specific motivic content for leading daily services within the Ashkenazic tradition. In practicum sessions, emphasis is on modal and motivic improvisation within the established framework of Nusach Ashkenaz. Students also learn appropriate congregational melodies for the daily services. Prerequisite: Musicianship Skills II, Liturgy of the Synagogue

Yom Kippur Nusach Mayer W, 11:15 am-1:15 pm 3

CG CANTR 554

Students receive instruction on the modes and motifs of Yom Kippur and how to lead services using motivic improvisation within the established framework of received Ashkenazic tradition. Students also learn appropriate congregational melodies. Students are also introduced to selected cantorial recitatives and coached on their authentic rendering. Prerequisite: Rosh Hashanah Nusach

Cantorial Coaching

Staff

TBA

1

CG CANTR 579

This course provides coaching by a practicing cantor who will guide the student according to his or her individual needs. Goals of coaching are to increase facility with prayer leading and to improve vocal and musical interpretations of selected repertoire as pertains to the Jewish Life Cycle. The student will be evaluated on the benchmark requirements by the third year of residency to ascertain proficiency.  Enrollment is limited to students who have successfully auditioned
into one of the SJM programs or by permission of the SJM. May be repeated
for credit.

Accompanied Repertoire for High Holidays
Syllabus

Treitman

Th, 9-11 am

3

CG CANTR 596

(Due to the High Holy Days, the first class meets on Monday, Sept. 23)

Students learn cantorial and congregational repertoire for High Holy Day services that involves instrumental accompaniment. Repertoire includes 19th-century European classics and 20th-century American composers and songwriters.
Prerequisite: Musicianship Skills II, Liturgy of the High Holidays

Cantorial Internship I

TBA

TBA

1

CANTR 921

Students spend a semester on location in a synagogue, observing a practicing cantor. The on-site cantor meets with and coaches the student in the practical application of skills learned in the classroom. Enrollment is limited to students who have successfully auditioned into one of the SJM programs.

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EDUCATION
         

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

Teaching and Facilitating Tefilla 

Richmond

M, 11:15 am-1:15 pm

2

CE EDUC 711

(The first class meets on Monday, Oct. 28)

This course is designed to connect the literature of effective teaching with the study of Jewish prayer. Critical-thinking activities will be emphasized as students create an active learner-centered classroom around the subject of prayer. Our topics will include effective teaching behaviors, second-language acquisition as it relates to the prayer book, cooperative learning with multiple intelligences, learner-centered assignments, differentiated instruction, technology, motivation and reflective teaching.

Models of Teaching in Jewish Education
Syllabus

Rodenstein

F, 9-11 am

3

CG EDUC 601 C1

(Due to the High Holy Days, the first class meets on Tuesday, Sept. 24)

In this course, students will analyze a wide repertoire of teaching models in Jewish education, influenced by content, students and institutional contexts, which represent techniques, philosophical approaches and values of teachers. The course will examine rationales for choosing or adapting different models and students will practice alternative approaches. Features of lesson planning and how to structure lessons and courses for Jewish educational settings will also be considered. In addition, students will reflect on their own teaching experiences and collaboratively assess alternative ways to address the range of educational issues that they encounter.

Models of Teaching in Jewish Education
Syllabus 

Rodenstein

Online

3

CG EDUC 601 W1

In this course, students will analyze a wide repertoire of teaching models in Jewish education, influenced by content, students and institutional contexts, which represent techniques, philosophical approaches and values of teachers. The course will examine rationales for choosing or adapting different models and students will practice alternative approaches. Features of lesson planning and how to structure lessons and courses for Jewish educational settings will also be considered. In addition, students will reflect on their own teaching experiences and collaboratively assess alternative ways to address the range of educational issues that they encounter.

Graduate Research Seminar in Jewish Education/Final Project 

Shire, Einhorn

W, 6:30-8 pm; meets monthly

1

CG EDUC 707

(First class meets Wednesday, Oct. 2)

This research seminar is the culmination of a student's years of study at Hebrew College and provides students with the opportunity to integrate their learning of Judaic texts with educational theories and practice. The final project allows students to further investigate a topic that intrigues them and relates to their work. Throughout the yearlong project, students will be guided by the seminar instructors, a faculty adviser of their choosing and by the seminar community itself. The project is then submitted as a bound written paper and presented orally at an end-of-year day of celebration. This course is yearlong, ending in May 2014.

Jewish Life and Values
Syllabus 

Kaunfer

Online

3

CG EDUC 625

The purpose of this course is to engage educators with major concepts and values of Jewish life. The course will have a dual focus: content knowledge and pedagogic application. In studying each topic, students will be asked to consider both the concepts and sources of the topic, and how the topic can be taught and experienced by students in various educational settings. Students will study each area using classic texts along with modern commentaries. Topics will include the Jewish life cycle (birth, bar/bat mitzvah, marriage, divorce, adoption, death); values such as tzedakah, relationship between parents and children, Talmud Torah, k'vod haberiyot, bikur cholim, views of God; and Jewish practice (kashrut, tallit and tefillin).

Teaching and Learning Jewish History
Syllabus 

Einhorn

Online

3

CG EDUC 591

This course interweaves pedagogy and content in an integrated approach to teaching about American Jewish history and life. Through primary and secondary sources, students will explore the evolution of American Jewish organizations as well as their contemporary work, constituents and challenges. At the same time, the faculty will introduce pedagogical theory to help students consider how to utilize this content in formal and experiential learning environments. Students will thus gain a graduate level understanding of the communities in which they work, the skills to critically analyze historical and contemporary institutional texts, and a chance to explore application to practice in a variety of educational settings. Assignments and dialogue among students will help to formulate individualized strategies for teaching this at appropriate age levels and in varied environments.

Human Development and Learning
Syllabus

Price

Online

3

CG EDUC 802

This course has two primary though somewhat separable goals: to introduce education students to models of human development, and to use this knowledge to analyze and create effective teaching paradigms for Jewish learners across the lifespan. Students will work on both goals simultaneously through a combination of didactic and experiential learning that focuses on a variety of Jewish educational settings.

Differentiated Instruction: Jewish Holidays and History
Syllabus 

Miller-Jacobs

Online: Sept. 30-Nov. 1

1

CG EDUC 569 W1

This course examines differentiated instruction, a way of thinking about teaching and learning that helps teachers manage an inclusive classroom in Jewish schools. Students will learn a variety of strategies for the Judaic curriculum that addresses the needs of all students, especially those with special needs. Students will create a differentiated unit to be used in their school as a model for creating additional units over time.

Differentiated Instruction: Jewish Holidays and History

Miller-Jacobs

M, 6-8 pm: Sept. 30-Oct. 28

1

CG EDUC 569 C1

course is canceledThis course examines differentiated instruction, a way of thinking about teaching and learning that helps teachers manage an inclusive classroom in Jewish schools. Students will learn a variety of strategies for the Judaic curriculum that addresses the needs of all students, especially those with special needs. Students will create a differentiated unit to be used in their school as a model for creating additional units over time. 

Jewish Views on Disabilities
Syllabus

Rothkopf

Online: Nov. 11- Dec. 13

1

CG EDUC 573

Jewish tradition has a great deal to say about disability. This module will trace the development of Jewish perspectives on disability from the bible through rabbinic sources and more contemporary understandings. We will consider issues pertaining to causation as well as Jewish responses to individuals with disability. This course is appropriate for education students as well as others interested in exploring the topic. 

Supervised Field Experience I

Schultz

This is a year-long course ending in May 2014

1

CG EDUC 915

Supervised experience in a Jewish setting (school, agency, synagogue, etc.) for the full academic year. A minimum of 6-10 hours per week is required. Experiences will be tailored to meet the professional goals and objectives of the individual student. If appropriate, a current paid position may be incorporated into the experience. Supervision will focus on execution of emerging skills, observation and basic knowledge. All field experiences must be approved by the director of field experiences. Prerequisite: Models of Teaching in Jewish Education

Supervised Field Experience II Schultz This is a year-long course ending in May 2014 1 CG EDUC 916

Supervised experience in a Jewish setting (school, agency, synagogue, etc.) for the full academic year. A minimum of 6-10 hours per week is required. Experiences will be tailored to meet the professional goals and objectives of the individual student. If appropriate, a current paid position may be incorporated into the experience. Supervision will focus on execution of emerging skills, observation and basic knowledge. All field experiences must be approved by the director of field experiences. Prerequisite: Supervised Field Experience I  

Jewish Education in the 21st Century 

TBA

Online

3

ED JLS 6260

Explores specific challenges that face leaders of Jewish educational institutions and how successful leaders confront them. Examines utilization of technology, creativity, integrated and differentiated approaches to education as myriad tools for exploring the next best practices for educational ventures in the 21st century. Offered to students enrolled in the Jewish Education Leadership Program only.

Jewish Education in the 21st Century

TBA

Online

3

CG EDUC 931

Explores specific challenges that face leaders of Jewish educational institutions and how successful leaders confront them. Examines utilization of technology, creativity, integrated and differentiated approaches to education as myriad tools for exploring the next best practices for educational ventures in the 21st century. Students must have approval of the dean to enroll.

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HEBREW (ON CAMPUS)
         

All classes require purchase of a standard Hebrew-English dictionary. 

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

Hebrew V
Syllabus

Davis

M, Tu, Th; 2:30-4 pm

3

CG HEBRW 205

Building on Hebrew III and IV, the two-semester sequence of Hebrew V and VI focuses on more advanced modern Hebrew language structures and prose writings. Students will deepen their understanding of the Hebrew language, with emphasis on skill acquisition and development through the extensive use of classical and modern texts. This course gives a systematic presentation of grammatical and syntactic principles of biblical and rabbinic Hebrew (including vocabulary). Texts of different styles, such as narrative, poetry, prophecy and wisdom literature, are examined with an emphasis on literary analysis. 

Hebrew VII
Syllabus 

Bock

Tu, Th; 2:30-4 pm

3

CG HEBRW 207

For students who want to work with classical Jewish texts in depth, including students in the rabbinic and cantorial programs, this course will focus on the phonology, morphology and syntax of biblical Hebrew. Solid prior knowledge of Hebrew, including mastery of the Hebrew verb system, is a prerequisite, as this course will assume such knowledge as it addresses aspects of Hebrew grammar that are distinctive of biblical Hebrew, including the Tiberian vocalization (niqqud) and accentuation system, biblical Hebrew's larger inventory of verb forms, and various syntactic features of biblical Hebrew. 

Understanding Texts 1

Davis

Th, 6:30-9:15 pm

4 UG

MG HEBRW 120

(Due to the High Holy Days, the first class meets on Monday, Sept. 23)

This course is designed for those with no prior knowledge of Hebrew who want to engage in the study of classical Jewish texts such as the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible), the siddur (prayer book) and classic rabbinic and Hasidic texts — in the original Hebrew. Students will begin learning basic Hebrew grammar and vocabulary needed to read such texts. The pace of the course will be brisk and a significant investment of study time outside the classroom will be expected. The course begins with an introduction to Hebrew grammar and the development of vocabulary. There will be some in-class conversation in Hebrew, but the emphasis will be on developing reading comprehension skills. 
 

Understanding Texts 3

Davis

W, 6:30-9:15 pm

4 UG

MG HEBRW 320

(Due to the High Holidays, the first class meets on Wednesday, Oct. 2)

This course is the third of the Understanding Hebrew Texts sequence. After completing volume III of the Shelabim textbook series, students will read selections from classical texts. Students will apply and extend their knowledge of Hebrew grammar to these texts and build their vocabulary, with the goal of enhancing their ability to independently read and understand Jewish texts in Hebrew. Wherever possible, connections will be made to Hebrew passages with which students are familiar from other contexts. The pace of the course will be brisk and a significant investment of time outside the classroom will be expected.
Prerequisite: Hebrew II, Understanding Hebrew Texts 2 

Sources: Reading in Hebrew

Davis

M, 6:30-9:15 pm

3

MG HEBRW 520

This course will offer a unique experience of learning Hebrew throughout its history, via diverse genres of literature. It will draw on a variety of Hebrew texts from a selection of sources including the Bible, mishnah, midrash, medieval texts, Hassidic tales, Haskala-era Hebrew literature and modern Hebrew short stories. The anthology of readings will be drawn from the book of Exodus, Ethics of Our Fathers, as well as works of Maimonides, Ramban, Yehuda HaLevi, Martin Buber, Shai Agnon, Hayim Nachman Bialik, Meir Shalev, Amos Oz and Etgar Keret. Grammatical concepts will be fully integrated into this literature-oriented course. Prerequisite: Hebrew IV or Understanding Hebrew Texts 4 

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HEBREW (ONLINE)
         

All classes require purchase of a standard Hebrew-English dictionary.

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

Mekhina (Preparation) for Hebrew Language 

Levy

Online

Non-credit only

CU HEBRW 010

This course is designed to serve as an introduction to Hebrew language study and to ensure that students with some prior Hebrew study experience begin Modern Hebrew I at comparable levels. The Mekhina introduces the Hebrew alphabet and vowels, as well as verbs and syntax sufficient for conducting simple daily conversation. Students progress at their own pace, submit oral and written homework and take online quizzes. Weekly real-time class discussions are conducted by the instructor with small groups of students at comparable levels. The Mekhina is based on the seven introductory units of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala" ("Hebrew From Scratch"), the textbook used by Hebrew College's campus-based and online Hebrew language programs. Textbook: Mekhina, Introductory units of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: No prior knowledge of Hebrew is required.

Hebrew I 

Levy

Online

4 UG

CU HEBRW 110

This course enables students to recognize and use fundamental structures of Hebrew grammar and morphology, and to acquire the necessary vocabulary for basic conversation and reading of modern and classical texts. All language skills are mastered through elementary syntactic and grammatical structures. Students will learn the basic verbs in the different common active verb groups and their conjugation in the present and past tense. Students will read and listen to stories and dialogues and participate in guided class discussions. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write their own dialogues and passages. All language skills are mastered through more advanced syntactic and grammatical structures. Textbook: Hebrew I, Lessons 1–14 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.

Hebrew IA

Levy

Online

2 UG

CU HEBRW 111A

This course covers the first half of Hebrew I, Lessons 1–7 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.
 

Hebrew IB 

Levy

Online

2 UG

CU HEBRW 111B

This course covers the second half of Hebrew I, Lessons 8–14 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.

Hebrew II 

Levy

Online

4 UG

CU HEBRW 210

A continuation of Hebrew I Online, this course enables students to recognize and use additional structures of Hebrew grammar, morphology and vocabulary to read modern and classical texts, and to engage in conversation. Students will read and listen to stories and dialogues, and participate in guided class discussions. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write their own dialogues and passages. All language skills are mastered through more advanced syntactic and grammatical structures. Students will learn the past tense of verb groups introduced in Hebrew I. Textbook: Hebrew II, Lessons 15–28 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew 1 or placement test.

Hebrew IIA 

Levy

Online

2 UG

CU HEBRW 211A

This course covers the first half of Hebrew II, Lessons 15–21 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew 1 or placement test.

Hebrew IIB 

Levy

Online

2 UG

CU HEBRW 211B

This course covers the second half of Hebrew II, Lessons 22–28 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew 2A or placement test.

Hebrew III 

Levy

Online

4 UG

CU HEBRW 310

Students will learn to recognize and use new and more complex structures of Hebrew grammar and morphology, such as combined sentences, and will acquire vocabulary for advanced reading of modern and classical texts, and for conversation. Lessons include readings of longer passages, dialogues and stories. Students will be given the opportunity to practice the new syntactic and grammatical structures. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write short expository passages and deepen their mastery of spoken Hebrew through participation in open conversation. Textbook: Hebrew III, Lessons 1-8 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or placement test.

Hebrew IIIA 

Levy

Online

2 UG

CU HEBRW 311A

This course covers the first half of Hebrew III, Lessons 1–4 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or placement test.

Hebrew IIIB 

Levy

Online

2 UG

CU HEBRW 311B

This course covers the second half of Hebrew III, Lessons 5–8 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 3A or placement test.

Hebrew IV 

Levy

Online

4 UG

CU HEBRW 410

This course is designed for intermediate students who have successfully mastered Hebrew reading, writing and speaking skills. Students will practice writing directed and complex sentences, as well as free composition. In weekly oral assignments and class discussions, only Hebrew is spoken. Through extensive readings, students will expand their vocabulary and increase their familiarity with grammatical patterns. Students will learn the future tense of basic verbs in the strong verb groups, as well as frequently used weak verbs. Textbook: Hebrew III, Lessons 9-16 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 or placement test.

Hebrew IVA 

Levy

Online

2 UG

CU HEBRW 411A

This course covers the first half of Hebrew IV, Lessons 9–12 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 or placement test.

Hebrew IVA 

Levy

Online

2 UG

CU HEBRW 411B

This course covers the second half of Hebrew IV, Lessons 13–16 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 4A or placement test.

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ULPAN
 

The Ulpan fall semester will run from Sept. 13 to Dec. 20. Click here for list of Ulpan courses

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HISTORY
         

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

Text and Context: Biblical and Rabbinical Periods
Syllabus 

Mesch

Online

3

CG HIST 541

In this course, we will encounter the Tanakh and rabbinic literature and the cultures and civilizations in which they developed. We will read substantial portions of original texts (in translation) along with key secondary sources to provide students with a framework through which they can gain understanding of the key issues and concepts that underlie these texts and their history. We will also be attentive to the variety of ways that the Bible and rabbinic literature are read and interpreted. There are no prerequisites for this class; it will be taught as an introductory course for graduate students and as an introduction to graduate work in Jewish studies.

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INTERDISCIPLINARY
         

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

Jewish Life and Practice I
Syllabus 

Klein

F, 11:30 am-1:00 pm

2

RBINTD 015

(Due to the High Holidays, the first class meets on Tuesday, Sept. 24)

This course introduces aspiring clergy and educators to the basic sources, practices and complexities of the Jewish life cycle. Students will gain fluency in the essential terminology of the Jewish life cycle and will explore the multiple approaches to Jewish ritual observance. We will integrate primary text study, secondary readings and our own personal encounters with ritual practice in order to build fluency and comfort in the practice of Judaism. We will also pay particular attention to the issue of encountering this material as future clergy and educators. Open to Mekorot level rabbinic and cantorial students only.

Spirituality & Social Justice: Martin Luther King Jr. and Abraham Joshua Heschel
Syllabus 

Rose

Online

3

CG INTD 560

In this semester-length course, the lives and writings of two of the most celebrated religious figures in twentieth-century American culture—Martin Luther King Jr. and Abraham Joshua Heschel—are critically examined, exploring areas of commonality and difference. How did these men read the sacred texts of their traditions? Who were their teachers and spiritual guides? How did they enter public life? What was their understanding of the relationship between religion and American democracy? How did they view the inter-religious dimensions of their work? In addition to our studies of the biographies and writings of these two men, we will also spend significant time exploring the social and political contexts in they which they met and worked together. This will include a sustained exploration of the movement for African American civil rights and various forms of Jewish engagement with this issue.

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JEWISH THOUGHT
         

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

The Rational Ideal and Its Opponents—Four Medieval Jewish Philosophers

Syllabus

Mesch

M, 2:30-4 pm

2

CG JTHT 519

In this course we are going to focus on the writings of four of the most influential writers and leaders of the Jewish Middle Ages. They are Saadya Gaon, Yehuda Halevi and Moses Maimonides (Rambam) and Nachmanides (Ramban). Saadya and Rambam were rationalists who believed in the ultimate importance of reason and its relevance to religion and to Judaism. Halevi, the poet and thinker, taught that while reason is important and useful, it is not essential for achieving the ultimate goal and purpose of religion. Finally we will look at Ramban who was a great Jewish thinker, mystic, rationalist, leader, poet and defender of Judaism. He intervened in the debate over the writings of Maimonides as a peace maker. We will be looking at these figures both as religious thinkers and religious leaders. How did they function as leaders and how did their overall understanding of Judaism affect their approach to community and leadership?

Three 20th Century Hasidic Leaders: The Courts of Lubavitch, Piaseczna and Satmar

Syllabus

Polen

M, 7-9 pm

3

CG JTHT 606

This course will examine the careers and representative writings of three of the most influential Hasidic masters of the 20th century, the Lubavitcher, the Piaseczner and the Satmar Rebbes. We will compare and contrast their respective approaches to the challenge of modernity within the rich world of Hasidism. Each of these leaders grappled with the transition from an inward facing mysticism to a theology that confronted the deep changes in the wider world and their impact on the Jewish community.

 
Introduction to the Study of Hasidic Texts
Syllabus

Syllabus



Syllabus

Green

Th, 4:30-6 pm (beit midrash) and 7:30-9:30 pm (class time)

3

RB JTHT 600 C1

Non-rabbinic students need permission of instructor to take this course. Please see this class in two ways. On the one hand, this is a real text course. It is about gaining skills with the materials, doing and discussing the readings, and learning lots about early Hasidism. But it is also meant to be an experience of "hakhanah le-shabbat." We will do a text dealing with the week’s parashah. The course will be based on texts found in "Speaking Torah: Spiritual Teachings from Around the Maggid’s Table," just published by Jewish Lights. We will also be reading and discussing a long essay from my translation of "Hasidism for a New Era: The Religious Writings of Hillel Zeitlin," published by Paulist Press. Students should acquire both of these books. Other essays will be offered in coursepacks. Level: All (Elective) Hebrew Level: Hebrew 8.

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LITURGY
         

COURSE TITLE

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

Workshop on Liturgical Halakhah
Syllabus 
Blank M, 11:15 am-1:15 pm: Sept. 16- Oct. 21 1  CG LITGY 595

The goal of this class is to familiarize students with the sources they need to answer questions about liturgical practice. We will use traditional and contemporary resources in Hebrew and English. In this workshop, each student will be expected to research fully several sample questions and present these to their colleagues. The purpose of this class is not to learn "how to daven" or the "right way" to do anything, but to learn how to best arrive at one's own answers and advise others. This course is intended for students of the SJM, but others may enroll with instructor's permission. Required level Hebrew 6. Enrollment is limited to 8 students. 

Liturgy of the Sabbath
Syllabus

Blank

M, 9-11 am


3

CG LITGY 594

This course will examine the prayer canon for the Sabbath using a multifaceted approach to the liturgy, including literary, theological, halakhic and exegetical aspects. In addition to studying the siddur as a basic text, the course will consider other sources, including rabbinic codes (Talmud, Mishnah Torah), in order to more fully understand the content and context of Sabbath prayer.  Prerequisite: Hebrew IV

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MUSIC
         

COURSE NAME

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

Music of the Jewish People
Syllabus 
Pinnolis Online 3

CG MUSIC 501

This online course investigates the role that music has played in Jewish life from ancient to modern times. Topics include music in the time of the Bible, rabbinic attitudes toward music, music and mysticism, the development of the modes for prayer and scriptural cantillation, church and synagogue music are compared, music of the holidays and the life cycle, folk and popular music in the Diaspora, the development of art music in the modern era and music in modern Israel. Prior knowledge of music is not required. Cannot count for graduate credit for the students in the Cantorial Ordination programs.

Jewish Music II
Syllabus

Jacobson Tu, 9-11 am 3 CG MUSIC 506

This course provides a detailed look at music composed by Jews as Jews from the nineteenth century to the dawn of the twenty-first century. Students not only examine music for its own intrinsic structure, but also consider it in the context of its cultural milieu. Study involves harmonic, melodic and formal analysis of selected compositions, as well as historical analysis through close reading of primary sources.  Prerequisite: Jewish Music I

Songs for the Jewish Year Klepper Th, 11:15 am-1:15 pm 3 CG MUSIC 544

(Due to the High Holy Days, the first class meets on Monday, Sept. 23)

Students learn a basic repertoire of songs including Israeli and American Jewish popular songs, zemirot and Hassidic niggunim. Instruction is also given in how to be an effective and inspiring song leader.  Prerequisite: Musicianship Skills 4

Voice Lessons

Staff

Private lessons

1

CG MUSIC 200

Emphasis is on understanding the working of the vocal mechanism, maximizing the potential of the individual singer, learning to be an effective vocal teacher and preparing the student to be an inspiring performer. Students will be taught how to use correct technique while singing a variety of different styles of music. Students will be required to participate in a studio recital once each semester and to memorize the music that is being performed. To adjudicate progress, students will be required to sing in Vocal Boards, performing a liturgical selection either from memory or from the Hebrew text, and a secular piece from memory from repertoire to be approved in advance. May be repeated for credit.

Musicianship Skills 2

Lieberman

Tu, 4:15-6:15 pm (starts Oct. 1)

3

CG MUSIC 302

Continuing on the skills learned in Musicianship Skills I, this course prepares students to sing at sight an intermediate vocal line; to sing all intervals; to recognize aurally all intervals, triads, scales and modes; to locate and play any pitch or triad on a keyboard; and to analyze the harmonies and phrase structure of intermediate compositions. Students are introduced to modes, extended chords and chord inversions. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Musicianship Skills 1

Kol Arev Workshop 

Leiberman

M, 4:30-6:30 pm

1

CG MUSIC 305

For students who have successfully auditioned for and who will serve during the academic year as members of Kol Arev, the Hebrew College choir, during the academic year. May be repeated for credit.

Choir

Lieberman


1

CE MUSIC 546

Students sing or serve as conducting interns in a choir specializing in Jewish repertoire. Participation must be approved in advance with the choir coordinator. May be repeated for credit.  

Senior Recital

Staff

Private lessons

1

CE MUSIC 905

Private lessons in singing with emphasis on preparing the student for the senior recital. This course is taken instead of voice lessons during final two semesters before graduation. May be repeated for credit.

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PARDES
         

The following courses, with the exception of Human Development and Learning, are offered to students enrolled in the Pardes Educators Program only.

COURSE NAME

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

COURSE NO.

The Art of Teaching
Syllabus 

Grumet

N/A

3

CG EDUC 615

This course focuses on the basics of planning and delivering effective lessons: establishing goals, maintaining the focus of the class, enduring understandings, discovery learning, essential questions, lesson planning, unit planning, formulating and reformulating questions, motivation, closure, homework and testing. Considerable attention is paid to applying basic principles of general education to the Jewish studies classroom, particularly in the day school setting.

The Art of Learning
Syllabus

Golombek

N/A

3

CG EDUC 616

This course focuses on various factors that influence a person's ability to learn: multiple intelligences, diverse learning styles/patterns, socio-economic and cultural backgrounds, and overall motivation. Theories are applied to helping learners more effectively through clear instructions, assessments, rubrics and differentiation in the classroom. While this course is designed primarily for day school teachers, concerns of teachers in any setting will be addressed. Self reflection on the individual as learner is an important element throughout the course. 

Human Development and Learning
Syllabus

Price

Online

3

CG EDUC 802

This course has two primary, though somewhat separable, goals: to introduce education students to models of human development, and to use this knowledge to analyze and create effective teaching paradigms for Jewish learners across the lifespan. Students will work on both goals simultaneously through a combination of didactic and experiential learning that focuses on a variety of Jewish educational settings.

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RABBINICS
         

COURSE NAME

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

YEAR

COURSE NO.

Introduction to Mishnah 

Leader

Tu, Th; 11:30 am-1 pm

4

CG RAB 513

This course is an intensive introduction to the form and content of the Mishnah, the first code of rabbinic law. Students will gain familiarity with  classical rabbinic syntax, key concepts and frequent forms of rabbinic teachings while building a foundation for further rabbinic literature. Prerequisite: Hebrew IV

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